B2B Revenue Acceleration
B2B Revenue Acceleration

Episode · 2 years ago

18: Podcasting Isn’t About Your Audience: It’s About Your Guests. w/ James Carbary

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Podcasting isn’t new in the B2B space.

But until recently, we had the wrong ideas about it. So we changed our thinking. Now, we’ve collaborated on episodes with our ideal prospects, and we shortened the length of each podcast.

James Carbary has some unique perspectives on podcast marketing.

He’s the CEO & Founder of Sweet Fish Media, one of the premier podcasting agencies in the B2B space. It’s been featured in TIME, Forbes, Entrepreneur, and Inc. James’s entire perspective is simple: B2B sales are difficult. Getting to that VP or high-level decision-maker is nearly impossible. Even if you do, they’re probably been pestered with other B2B sales calls all day long.

James does something different: He helps brands develop their ideal podcasts with ideal clients as guests. It’s a game changer.

You're listening to be to B RevenueAcceleration, a podcast dedicated o helping software executives stay on thecutting edge of sailes and marketing and their industry. Let's get into theshow hi welcome to be to be a revenueacceleration. My name is oin with he and I'm here today with Jamscowberyfrom sweetfish media w you doing ca, gems, I'm fantastic grey. How are you Iam very good. Thank you very, very good. So we've invited you jams, hre today,to speak about podcasting as part of a Soclido ship strategy, but before wedive into the details before we pick your Brak around the topic, it would bevery useful if you can tell us a little bit more about yourself as well asswetfish media yeah. So myself, I kind of had a assorted path to getting towhere I am so spent. You know, first few years out of college kind ofbouncing from corporate job to corporate job and worked it. You knowthem worked at a smaller business that had nothing to do with what I'm doingnow is doing helicapter logistics for Nascar for a few years and then workedat a tech start up an a nonprofit and just a really o long and windy path andeventually ended up doing what we're doing now. We started the business as acontent writing shop and about a year into that, saw the massive opportunitythat there was to start producing podcast for companies with a little bitdifferent angle than how most people were looking at it. Most people look atpodcasting in terms of like how many listeners your show has a d, and wereally look at it by the quality of the guests that you're bringing onto theshow and so from an ABM standpoint. We think podcasts are incredibly effectivebecause you can pretty much ask anyone that you want to know to be a guest onyour show, and so that was kind of our approach and our perspective on it. Andso that's what we do now. At's we've done for the last two and a half yearsis, is produced. PODCASTS for really...

...innovative BTB brands and we're lovingit. Well, thanks for ad cans, your pustnol background is definitelyinteresting and obviously we are a client of sweetfish media. So we lovethe valley proposition on Doson, which wouare trying to achieve sot. Thatmakes perfect sense to us. So all the recent months and I'm talking aboutourselfhere, we've seen that podcasting is becoming much more popular in the inthe bet to be space, and we can see companies from almost tall industriesor size starting to have their own shows. Why do you believe podcast as asa medium is growing in such a at space? And what do you see as being the mainreasons for company to stop posdcasting yeah? That's a great question right. Ithink there are few different reasons, one. I think people are finallystarting to realize the trust that comes along with podcasting, because ofhow much time people spend with you when they're listening to your podcast.So, for example, if you write a blog post and you rank in Google and the topten for a particular search term, people that end up reading that postwill maybe spend ten to fifteen seconds with your brand reading that postthey're scrolling through it they're consuming that content very quickly. Alot of other types of content are the same way but with a podcast, becausepeople are consuming podcast, passively theyre, listening to them on the on thetrain to work driving to work, mowing the yard doing dishes working out atthe gym, so they're consuming it passively so they're listening to thecontent for much longer so they're, listening to a fifteen twenty thirtyminute episode, which builds an enormous amount of trust. So I thinkthere's that component. I think the other side of it is people understandthat when you are the media, when your company is, is first a media company,then whatever you do like what Gary v...

...says that you have the leverage. Sowhen you have a podcast youall of a sudden have a lot more leverage,because you can approach people as the media, not as a company trying to sellsomething. So I think a combination of those reasons is why Beato be companiesare really starting to embrace the platform. That's interesting, Tho. Onething that you mentioned is about the length of the podcast. Is there anybest practices that you guys suggest your clients in Terme of our longerpodcast fould? Last yeah yeah, that's a great question! We get that a lot sowith our podcast is called Beto, be growth and we've done really reallywell. We ranked, for the term, be to be in the ITN tego system, so it's allowedour audience to grow really quickly and the the thing that we found from fromour audience is that they really like shorter content so twelve to fifteenminutes, they really like action pack kind of nonfluffy content, so not a lotof hey. How is your day? How many kids do you have? Oh, that's funny this all the the Luft that you typicallyhere in a in a one to two hour podcast. We found that our particular audiencedoesn't really enjoy that much. I know personally, I don't enjoy it. You'vegot people like Tim Ferris that can pull off the two hour podcast becausehe's talking to someone so famous that you're just compelled to listen, but Idon't think most people have that luxury. I think the more brief you canbe, the more to the point you can be and the more focused you can be ondelivering value and not fluff the better. So so, to answer your question,I would say you know that twelve to twenty minute range is probably a safeplace to aim for in terms of Lenth, okay, excillent wet thanks for that.Speaking about our own experience year, toparatic we've decided to start thispodcast to support our SOT leadorship strategy, as well as trying to bringvaluable content to our business...

...community, but I'm sure that auigencewould be interest in learning what kind of reesults they can expect. Ourcompaniy, a coparatics, could expect from podcasting, and how can we measureRi? So my next question for you, jims isreally a wrong. Could you appreciiate with us? Our podcast can bringcompanies, business and Ritenon investment yeah. I think the biggestway to measure the Roi of a podcast is in the quality of the guests thatyou're bringing onto the show. I think a lot of people assume that the waythat you're able to get Roi is to get a bunch of listeners and then thoselisteners turn into customers and that a certainly can happen. It just takes awhile to do that, because building an audience with a podcast. Just it takestime like it does any other content medium, but the much the quicker way ofgetting or Wi is branding your show around your ideal client. So, insteadof branding it around yourself, you're branding it around your ideal buyer. So,for example, with ourwith me to be growth with our show, I didn't brand.The show the BTB podcasting show, even though BTO be podcasting is ourexpertise. Instead, I branded the show be to be Grosse, because I wanted totalk to VPS of marketing at BTB Tet companies, because those are the folksthat buy our service, and so, when you brand the show around your ideal buyer,you can then go to your ideal buyer and collaborate with them to create contentwith them. So you interviewing them on your show and it's through thoserelationships. You're building with your guests, those folks are actuallygoing to buy from you much earlier than listeners of your show. So I think thebiggest metric that you need to measure is who who are the guests that havebeen on our podcast, that we have been able to nurture relationships with andturn those into customers? So that's...

...that's the biggest one? Okay, so I it'sso if I was to rephrase that slately you can potentially expect to getbusiness from listener, so people I will find you to their research. PeopleWi go to the gym, the commuter and all that. But from your perspective, youbelieve that you will take a little bit longer, so the DS paid at SOE and, Ithink, hit's- probably very, very pottinin from a bit to be perspective.It for gots almost getting your ideal idle ideal cients to participate to thePODCAST shather expiens final topehat will suit them and then eventually fromthat podcast creater relationship and if things go well, otther commercialrelationship with at clans moving forward H, t that that' right yeah. Ithink that I think that too many people they wonder why their colde mails andtheir co calls aren't working and it's because I think people are tired ofbeing sold to, and I don't think that's people don't wake up in the morning andwish that they got another cold call or another sales email. But there isincreasingly especially with the more and more relevance that personal brandhat is for people in People's minds. Everyone wants to have a betterpersonal brand. Everyone wants to be featured as a celebrity in the media,and so that's as a media company, someone with a podcast. That's that'swhat you have the ability to give someone so you're able to add value tothem in a way. That's independent of the product or service that you selland the value that you're giving them is media exposure, you're, giving themfree PR and- and so I think, I think, by leading with that by leading withvalue featuring them on your show. It then sets you up to have a genuinerelationship with that person and people buy from you know, folks thatthey know like and trust, and so I think that's what the podcastultimately set you up. You know I will had one argument in your favor E aswell: We've had the fedback, so obviously we have lots of differentmedium to go to prospectn conferences. We can have like a very, very tellodacon base paper approach and we get our...

...own meeting with prospectand. Before weget to a meeting prospects will res Researches. They will resorve thecompany and some of the FIDBA that we've had because of the podcastbecause of yours ar content, but mainly around the podcast. I think he's alsobringing reinsurance it's bringing a sotledership. It's making people feelconfortable. So I would not say that is almost a ale generator, but almost likea conversation accelerator or something that will warm. U People to believethat they will actually meet with someone with part of a company that isreally at the fourt front of what's happening in the domain. So to your point of you know the listenerthat could become the prospect that you can invite they can become customers. Ithink ther resolrts wo the Oser prosper that you are speaking to were doing the due diligence on your company, makingSuret youthe right organization when they compalyou with someone who's gotabsolutely zero content, zero sort, leaderships, Yero relationship withexperts in the market. That's just someone who's been spending a bit oftime in trying to get around the best way, the best practicees, and all thatI think it telks as well, and we've had that fitback with not just me thinkingit. I it's proof in the pudding and something that we've already seen awitnessed as as a positive outcome from from the time that were investing inthe podcast and t inven that oim making in ingineer world to get it going. Ilove it. That's that's fantastic and I totally agree, I think, with thecontent that comes along with it. You know the blog posts, the status atBates. You know, I think, enabling your sales team, withthe content from your podcast, whether it be the actual audiofile or therepurposed blog post, being able to have your equip your sales team withwith content that, like you said, establishes your thought leadership. Iabsolutely believe Wer agree with you that that, at as a conversationaccelerator in a big big way, so that's...

...extremely interesting, and thanks forcovering that question of Arong, theroy and measurement of secess, I think thisis a key poxtrally for audience and the type of people that we wish to wavelistening to the show, I think that's definitely a question they would ever sfor you, but to fin finalize we've recently launched category that you'vecalled content based netwalking. Can you please share with us the dad andthe meaning of that concept yeah? So we came up at this term earlier this yearand the way we define it, we define it by essentially saying it'scollaborating with your ideal clients, potential, foral partners and industryinfluencers to build meaningful relationships by creating contenttogether. So obviously, this was like the premise that we started our agencywith. We do podcast, but we're really much more passionate about relationshipbuilding than we are. You know the medium of podcasting. That just happensto be. You know, I think the most efficient form of content collaborationis podcasting. So that's what we that's! What we got into Sowas, as I was thinking about kind of category cration,the importance of category creation, allowing you to swim in your own lane,as opposed to competing with a bunch of other competitors, thout meand, thisidea of this concept of content base networkingis actually much bigger than podcasting, which is our Corse Service. Sopodcasting is a part of it, but you can you can collaborate with people in avariety of different ways and so as we've kind of begun, to create contentaround this topic, where people are collaborating with folks to create blogcontent with them. Video series I've even seen companies collaborate withtheir ideo buyers to create like full length like documentaries. So you canget really creative with the type of content that you can create with yourpotential buyers. But at the end of the...

...day, it's all mapping to the sameresult. It's content collaboration as a mechanism to build meaningfulrelationship, and then business actually comes from that meaningfulrelationship, and it's not overnight. It doesn't happen instantly, but itabsolutely happens in our businessis living proof of that and a lot of ourcustomers. Companies as well are growing on the back of relationshipsare building through the collaborative content that they produce in. You know,obviously, for our clients, it's a podcast, because that's what we do forthem, but or tons of different ways to do it. So so that's what content basenetworking is all about using content as a way to grow your network with aspecific targeted people that you want to meet yeah. That's again, this isreivent to US I', not Sur, but the volume of Apiza that are publishing asa time at the time of speaking today to be fail. Gems. But what we see we seethat each ship is ai is generating quite a bit of quite a bit of noise,particularly on platform like Linetin, where you can really see peopleincorrecting. When we publishin Apizza, I can see lots of people coming to ourprofile. We've got our marketing manager Wis, showing us the peoplecoming and following oporatics as a company checking us out. You know- andI think that's that's an important part as part of a global account base marketin your approach and being able to target the right people. I think it'san important part as well to grow that community of followers and that ward ofmouth around the brains Oiy so Olli thanks for your time today, jams I meanthis was inside furn and I'm Shur. My AU listener will go away with quite alot of interesting information around podcast, but also believe that some ofthem may be interested to took to you. You know that on thos tond how they cando podcast for themselves in a way. So if someone wants to connect with you,if someone from audience wants to get in touch with you gems, what is thebest way to get all of you yeah? Thank you so much Raiv. So my email is Jamesat sweetfish mediacom. They coan find...

...me on linked ad, I'm on Linkan. Quite abit. Last name is car Bary, so James carberry on he linkdin on twitter aswell at James Carberry, and then, if they just want to listen to to our show,we do it's becoming more than a daily show. At this point, we're starting todo multiple episodes Aday, but the PIDEGASS is called btab growth, and sothey can just type in BTB growth in apple, podcasts and they'll, see ourshow pull up so would love to connect with any of your listeners right andreally appreciate. You have me on today. It was great, I think you on the TroJimes. Thank you or much real time. Thank you. UPERADICS has redefined the meaning ofrevenue generation for technology companies worldwide, while thetraditional concepts of building and managing insize sales teams in househas existed for many years. Companies are struggling with the lack of focus,agility and scale required in today's fast and complex world of enterprisetechnology sales. Seeo operatics can help your company accelerate pipelineat operatics. Dot Net you've been listening to be to be revenueacceleration to ensure that you never miss an episode subscribe to the showin your favorite podtask player. Thank you so much for listening until nexttime.

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