B2B Revenue Acceleration
B2B Revenue Acceleration

Episode · 3 years ago

18: Podcasting Isn’t About Your Audience: It’s About Your Guests. w/ James Carbary

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Podcasting isn’t new in the B2B space.

But until recently, we had the wrong ideas about it. So we changed our thinking. Now, we’ve collaborated on episodes with our ideal prospects, and we shortened the length of each podcast.

James Carbary has some unique perspectives on podcast marketing.

He’s the CEO & Founder of Sweet Fish Media, one of the premier podcasting agencies in the B2B space. It’s been featured in TIME, Forbes, Entrepreneur, and Inc. James’s entire perspective is simple: B2B sales are difficult. Getting to that VP or high-level decision-maker is nearly impossible. Even if you do, they’re probably been pestered with other B2B sales calls all day long.

James does something different: He helps brands develop their ideal podcasts with ideal clients as guests. It’s a game changer.

You were listening to be tob revenue acceleration, a podcast dedicated to helping software executive stay on the cutting edge of sales and marketing in their industry. Let's get into the show. Hi, welcome to be to be a revenue acceleration. My Name is opinion with you and I'm here today with James carberry from sweet fish media. Are You doing today? Gems, I'm fantastic. Ray, are you? I am very good. Thank you very, very good. So we've invited you, James, here today to speak about podcasting as part of a sort leadership strategy. But before we dive into the details, before we pick your break around the topic, it would be very usefully if you can tell us a little bit more about yourself, as well as switch fish media. Yeah, so myself, I kind of had a a sordid path to getting to where I am. So spent, you know, first few years out of college kind of bouncing from corporate job to corporate job and worked at you know, then worked at a smaller business that had nothing to do with what I'm doing now, is doing helicopter logistics for Nascar for a few years, and then worked at a tech start up at a nonprofit and just a really a long and windy path and eventually ended up doing what we're doing now. We started the business as a content writing shop and about a year into that saw the massive opportunity that there was to start producing podcast for companies with a little bit different angle than how most people were looking at it. Most people look at podcasting in terms of like how many listeners your show has and and we really look at it by the quality of the guests that you're bringing on to the show. And so, from an ABM standpoint, we think podcasts are incredibly effective because you can pretty much ask anyone that you want to know to be a guest on your show, and so that was kind of our approach and our perspective on it, and so that's what we do now. That's we've done for the last two and a half years,...

...is is produced podcasts for really innovative bb brands and we're loving it. Well, thanks for that, jims. Your personal backgrounds is definitely interesting and obviously we are a client of sweet fish media, so we love the value proposition on theos what you are trying to achieve. So that makes perfect sense to us. So all the recent months, and I'm talking about our SELFIA, we've seen that podcasting is becoming much more popular in the in the B tob space, and we can see companies from almost all industries or size starting to have their own shows. Why do you believe podcast as a medium is growing in such a fast space, and what do you see as being the main reasons for company to stop podcasting? Yeah, that's a great question right. I think there are a few different reasons. One, I think people are finally starting to realize the trust that comes along with podcasting because of how much time people spend with you when they're listening to your podcast. So, for example, if you write a blog post and you rank in Google in the top ten for a particular search term, people that end up reading that post will maybe spend ten to fifteen seconds with your brand reading that post. They're scrolling through it, they're they're consuming that content very quickly. A lot of other types of content are the same way, but with a podcast, because people are consuming podcasts passively. They're listening to them on the on the train to work, driving to work, mowing the yard, doing dishes, working out at the gym. So they're consuming it passively. So they're listening to the content from much longer so they're listening to a fifteen, twenty, thirty minute episode, which builds an enormous amount of trust. So I think there's that component. I think the other side of it is people understand that when you are the media, when your company is is first a media company, then whatever you do, like what Gary v says, that you have the...

...leverage. So when you have a podcast you have a sudden have a lot more leverage because you can approach people as the media, not as a company trying to sell something. So I think a combination of those reasons is why beautby companies are really starting to embrace the platform. That's interesting to one thing that you mentioned is about the lengths of the podcast. Is there any best practices that you guys suggest to your clients and time of our longer podcasts would last? Yeah, yeah, that's a great question. We get that a lot. So with our podcast, is called be to be growth and we've done really, really well. We ranked for the term be to be in the itunes ecosystem. So it's allowed our audience to grow really quickly and the thing that we found from from our audience is that they really like shorter content, so twelve to fifteen minutes. They really like action pack kind of Non Fluffy content, so not a lot of hey, how is your day? How many kids do you have? Oh, that's funny. This all the all the fluff that you typically hear in a in a one to two hour podcast. We found that our particular audience doesn't really enjoy that much. I know personally I don't enjoy it. You've got people like Tim Ferris that can pull off the Tohour podcast because he's talking to someone so famous that it you're just compelled to listen. But I don't think most people have that luxury. I think the more brief you can be, the more to the point you can be in the more focused you can be on delivering value and not fluff, the better. So so to answer your question, I would say you know that twelve to twenty minute range is probably a safe place to aim for in terms of length. Okay, excellent sports. Thanks for that. Speaking about all experiency, autoparatic, we've decided to stop this podcast to support our sort leadership strategy, as well as trying to bring valuable content to our business...

...community. But I'm sure that the audience would be interesting in learning what kind of results they can expect, all company a corporatics could expect from podcasting and how can we measure Roi? So my next question for you, James. He's really a wrong could you please show with us how podcasts can bring companies business and written on investment? Yeah, I think the biggest way to measure the Roi of a podcast is in the quality of the guests that you're bringing onto the show. I think a lot of people assume that the way that you're able to get Roi is to get a bunch of listeners and then those listeners turn into customers, and that certainly can happen. It just takes a while to do that, because building an audience with a podcast just it takes time, like it does any other content medium. But the much the the quicker way of getting oury is branding your show around your ideal client. So instead of branding it around yourself, you're branding it around your ideal buyer. So, for example, with our with beb growth, with our show, I didn't brand the show the BDBPI padcasting show, even though be to be podcasting is our expertise. Instead, I branded the show be to be gross because I wanted to talk to VP's of marketing at BEDB tech companies, because those are the folks that buy our service. And so when you brand the show around your ideal buyer, you can then go to your ideal buyer and collaborate with them, to create content with them, so you interviewing them on your show and it's through those relationships you're building with your guests those folks are actually going to buy from you much earlier than listeners of your show. So I think the biggest metric that you need to measure is who, who were the guests that have been on our podcast that we have been able to nurture relationships with and turn those into customers? So that's that's the biggest one.

Okay, so it's so, if I was to rephrase that' slately so you can potentially expect to get business from Lissa now. So people I will find. You do that research to people who go to the gym, the commuter and all that. But from your perspective, you believe that you will take a little bit longer. So dys pay that you and I think it's probably very very continent from a bit to pe perspective. It's abouts almost getting your ideal I don't ideal clients to participate to the PODCAST, show that experience, final to opy. That will shut them and then eventually, from that podcast, create a relationship and if things go well, I have a commercial relationship with that clients moving forward. That the right yeah, I think that. I think that too many people they wonder why they're cold emails and their cold calls aren't working, and it's because, I think people are tired of being sold to. And I don't think that's people don't wake up in the morning and wish that they got another cold call or another sales email. But there is an increasingly especially with the more and more relevance that personal brand is for people. In People's minds, everyone wants to have a better personal brand. Everyone wants to be featured as a celebrity in the media, and so that's as a media company, someone with a podcast, that's that's what you have the ability to give someone. So you're able to add value to them in a way that's independent of the product or service that you sell, and the value that you're giving them is media exposure you're giving them free pr and and so I think, I think by leading with that, by leading with value, featuring them on your show, it then sets you up to have a genuine relationship with that person and people buy from you know, folks that they know, like and trust, and so I think that's what the podcast ultimately set you up. You know, I would add one arguments in your fav I as well. We've had the feedback. So obviously we have lots of different medium to go to prospect and know confroncs. We can have like a very, very tail all that Calm Bay's Papele for approach and we get down...

...meeting with prospect and before we get to a meeting prospects were research just they will resort the company and some of the feedback that we've add because of the podcast, because of the other content, but mainly around the podcast. I think he's also bringing reinsurance. It's bringing so leadership, it's making people feel comfortable. So I would not say that it's almost at a lead generator, but almost like a conversation accelerator or something that will warm a people to believe that they will actually meet with someone with part of a company. It is really at the forefront of what's happening in that domain. So, to your point of you know, the listener that could become the prospect that you can invite, they can become customers. I think there is also the other prospect that you are speaking to. Well, doing the due diligence on your company, making sure that you're the right organization, and when they compel you with someone who's got absolutely zero content, zero sort leaderships, zero relationship with expert in the market, versus someone who's been spending a bit of time in trying to get the other around the best way, the best practices and all that, I think it tells as well, and we've had that feedbacks with not just me thinking it. It's it's it's a proof in the pudding and something that we've already seen or witnessed as as a positive outcome from from the time that we are investing in the podcast and investment are making in general to get it going. I love it. That's that's fantastic and I totally agree, I think, with the content that comes along with it. You know, the blog posts, the status updates, you know, I think enabling your sales team with the content from your podcast, whether it be the actual audio file or the repurposed blog post, being able to have your equip your sales team with with content that, like you said, establishes your thought leadership. I absolutely believe, we're agree with you that that at as a conversation accelerator in a big, big way. So that's extremely interesting and thanks for covering...

...that question of around the Arrowy and and measurement of success. I think this is a key USTULLIFOLOGIENCE and the type of people that we wish to have listening to the show. I think that's that's definitely a question they would ever ask for you. But to fin finalize, we've recently launched category that you've called content based netwalking. Can you please share with us the dead and the meaning of that concept? Yeah, so we came up with this term earlier this year and the way we define it. We define it by essentially saying it's collaborating with your ideal clients, potential for all partners and industry influencers to build meaningful relationships by creating content together. So obviously this was like the premise that we started our agency with. We do podcast, but we're really much more passionate about relationship building than we are, you know, the media of podcasting. That just happens to be. You know, I think the most efficient form of content collaboration is podcasting. So that's what we that's what we got into. And so as I was thinking about kind of category creation, the importance of category creation allowing you to swim in your own lane as opposed to competing with a bunch of other competitors, thought me and this idea of this concept of content based networking is actually much bigger than podcasting, which is our core service. So podcasting is a part of it, but you can you can collaborate with people in a variety of different ways, and so as we've kind of begun to create content around this topic, where people are collaborating with folks to create blog content with them, video series. I've even seen companies collaborate with their ideo buyers to create like full link like documentaries. So you can get really creative with the type of content that you can create with your...

...potential buyers. But at the end of the day it's all mapping to the same result. It's content collaboration as a mechanism to build meaningful relationship and then business actually comes from that meaningful relationship and it's not overnight, it doesn't happen instantly, but it absolutely happens. In our business is living proof of that and a lot of our customers companies as well, are growing on the back of relationships are building through the collaborative content that they produce. And you know, obviously for our clients it's a podcasts because that's what we do for them, but are turned to different ways to do it. So so that's what content based networking is all about, using content as a way to grow your network with us, specific targeted people that you want to meet. Yeah, that's again, this is relevant to us. I'm not sure, but the volume of episode that we are publishing as a time, at the time of US speaking today, to be fair, gems. But what we see? We see that each ship is all is is generating quite a bit of a quite a bit of noise, particularly on platform like Linkedin. While you can really see people interacting when we publish an a pizza, I can see a lots of people coming to our profile. We've got our marketing manager with showing us the people coming and following operatics as a company, checking us out, you know, and and I think that's that's an important part as as part of a global account based marketing, you approach and being able to target the right people. I think it's an important part as well to grow that community of followers and that word of mouth around the brand. Totally, so, totally thanks for your time today, James. I mean this was insight full and and I'm showing my our listener will go away with quite a lot of interesting information around podcast. But also believe that some of them may be interested to talk to you, you know, that to understand how they can do podcast for themselves in a way. So if someone wants to connect with you, if someone from our audience wants to get in touch with you, James, what is the best way to who get to one of you? Yeah, thank you so much, ray of so. My email is james at...

...sweet fish Mediacom. They can find me on Linkedin. I'm on Linkedin quite a bit. Last name is sear be aary. So James carberry on the linkedin on twitter as well at James Carberry. And then if they just want to listen to to our show, we do. It's becoming more than a daily show. At this point we're starting to do multiple episodes a day. But the PODCAST is called be to be growth, and so they can just type in BB growth in apple podcasts and they'll see our show pull up. So would love to connect with any of your listeners right and really appreciate you having me on today. It was great. I think you on the trore times. Thank you very much for time. Thank you. operatics has redefined the meaning of revenue generation for technology companies worldwide. While the traditional concepts of building and managing inside sales teams inhouse has existed for many years, companies are struggling with a lack of focus, agility and scale required in today's fast and complex world of enterprise technology sales. See How operatics can help your company accelerate pipeline at operatics dotnet. You've been listening to be to be revenue acceleration. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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