B2B Revenue Acceleration
B2B Revenue Acceleration

Episode · 2 years ago

30: Drive Sales by Investing in Your Personal Brand w/ Dale Dupree

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

What does being a major signed heavy metal musician and an amazing salesperson  have to do with each other?

Everything.

Dale Dupree is widely known as the Copier Warrior as well as being the host of the Selling Local Podcast and leader of the Sales Rebellion. Dale understands personal branding in a way that many in the corporate world do not.

On a recent episode of The B2B Revenue Acceleration Podcast, Dale joined me to discuss personal branding. Particularly the critical need for authenticity, transparency, and creativity.

While it may cost you in the short term, these branding traits are critical. They will set you apart and drive more sales.

He explains how developing his authentic brand has led to more closed deals, the push back he has received from corporate culture, despite record sales, his best practices for personal brand building, and how all mistakes are good.

You're listening to be to B RevenueAcceleration, a podcast dedicated helping software executives stay on thecutting edge of sales and marketing in their industry. Let's get into the show, I welcome to be to be a revenueacceneration. My name is Oreny with he and im her today with Dele Jupre, alsoknown as the Copur warror. Are you doing today, then doing great thanksfor having me an no problem at all? So today we will be talking aboutpromoting your personal braind to increase sat, but before we get intodetails, can you please introduce yourself to auudience and tell US maleabout? Who is the COPIOWIO? Absolutely I'm happy to so so my name is Daledefre I live and have been born and raised, which is unheard of by mostpeople in Orlando Florida. Typically, people that are from Florida came froma cold state and they came here to get away from the snow, but I was actuallyborn in the hospital down the street from where I live, the copy warror. Hisorigins start with my Faher one thousand nine hundred and eighty four,my father founded a small business. It was a copier firm and then I was bornon housand nine hundred and eighty five, and so people like to say that tonerwas running through my blood from the day that I came out of the worm. Soinevitably I went and I worked with my father throughout my Upbrin and Iactually ended up around the time. I was seventeen touring the world with myband, who assigned to a major record label. We played heavy metal music,which a lot of people hear that and then look at me and go what eabut about the time I was wo, twoesneHund and twenty two. I decided that the music scene wasn't where I wanted tospend the rest of my career, then I wanted to create something a little bitbigger than than what I had done in that scene as well too. I wanted tohonor my father's legacy be a little bit closer to my family, and so I madethe choice to come back and and work for my dad, which was easy at the sametime too. So because I knew my dad would hire me because I would just tellmy mom if he wouldn't in the first place and get him in trouble, so so Ispent the next about ten years with my father, working alongside of him in thecopyer industry and even through an...

...acquisition when we sold the companyand that's that's me in a nut- show okay, so they I know that you've beenworking full time as a Copye of repers you just mentioned, but many people wilalso know you as being the hust of the selling local podcast. Oso will befamiliar with you as the leader of the cells rebellion. So I'd like to learnmore about our running thes pareel projects. Alongside your daily Jug agyou to drive more sense, more reputation to what towars you. I thinkit's a great question, because it was one of the first focuses that I had tohave in that. If we're passionate about something- and we want to make a careerout of it, but we also have these five six other things we want to do. We canget lost inside of that, and so for me who the copyor warrior is and what theselling local podcast is and also what the sale o the concept of the salesrebellion is. Is that they all complement back to me to Dale Defre,but and at the end of the day, that's who lays down and goes to sleep and sowhe. I started the selling local podcast, because I decided that Iwanted to start speaking to my audience a little bit more and my audience beingmy biers. I wanted them to see deeper into my thought process as asalesperson, and I thought that it would build report with them and so andseling local. I tell my stories about my selles triumphs and failures. Italkd about my theories behind sales. I talk about a lot of different thingsthat typically, we would just want other sales people to hear, but not mebecause I'm an open book and I like transparency and I love vulnerability.I think that it builds a better relationship and I think that peoplebuy from those that they like and they trust. So so I decided to start sellinglocal so that people cand see more of my culture and get that look. You knowbehind the curtain, the sales rebellion. You know I started earning the nickdameof being the leader of the sales rebellion just because my whole lifereally hi'd been a rebel. U From the time that I was in music to the tocoming home, O or my father, I've always ust t o against the norm. So Iwas about to say: Evy, metal and...

...rebellion seems to be like going welltogether. Yes, they do so again. I just I've run with with that over the yearsas well to, but recently I have made a transition inside of my career that Ihaven't announced anybody yet and I'm essentially I'm running a little bitfurther and deefer into the thought of being the leader of the cells rebellioninstead of it just being a concept and again I'll be announcing soon what I'mdoing, but I think I prefer that most people get imaginative with. What'sgoing on, I like the experience behind work and and life. I, like e thethought of it being an adventure. I like I don't like the Dole and themundane and the bland, and so I've been launching this new project for aboutthirty days, and people are messaging me gaily and going hated. I Miss Yourannouncement, but the truth is: Is that I'm going to run it until people are socurious that they're about to explode? I like it. Oh that's the teas, ofoaudience, Veryo, God yeah. Everybody should follow you now on a daily basis,refresh Fre, fresh, refresh, okay, good, but obviously nol this the selling local and the cell isrebellion of they an they actually generated business for you. Can you sayto Talgens for O probven to me: Okay, I've actually cluised that deal or thatpiece of business came from me being out there and building up my own brand.Yes, absolutely so. The and the copier warrnor in general, as a brand, hasalso been huge for me because if you think about copiers, most people willsay: Well, that's a commodity product that twenty people sell in my area andthey knock on my door or they call my phone all the time and then the mostannoying ob noxious people that I can think of. Although there are some goodones out there, I'm not bashing I'll copy yourself reps, but because of ourart industry and Sai such a commodity. We are, we are trained and taught todialdow Dow Dow Dal until we find an opportunity and then press as hard aswe can full court to get that deal done so that we can cash a check and thenget to the next get to the next get the next. So for me, I decided to slow thatdown and I said wow you know I'm going to create the copy of warrior, and so,when I walk in and I'm the twentieth...

...guy out of the other nineteen that showup before me, that's they will look at me differently that I will causecuriosity that I will be this undeniable force in my industry, for mybuyer and for no other reason, and not for my boss, not for my company, butfor my buyer, to serve my buyer, to give them an experience and to helpthem to understand the midts of the industry. All the things that they haveknown to be quote unquote, true for so long. That really are false. So usingthe seling local podcast. I did occasionally have a guest on here andthere and still do that, will be aligned with me so that I can talk totheir audience and and maybe even speak with their company a little bit moreabout what I do. So the idea of the podcast is again that to help people tosee a little bit closer and deeper into who I am but because people enjoylistening to it, especially in my area here when I knock on your door, peopleknow the copy or warrior they listen to the podcast they've heard of itselfEbiltin. So it's been both good with inbound and in my olbound efforts andhelping people to recognize me. I think he's very refreshing because there'salso some some, I would say a touch of humor in the way you go about it, which,which I think is very important in the the communitys latspotentially boringmarket. If you will being a little bit different, I'm trying to soarch for theworld eccentric. Should I say I think, is h. What is absolutely it's justit's,just refreshing, it's just refreshing ECAS. You know people wo like on thepestinal level and, I think, t a h t that makes a whole differente vesusyears, Lik a coming white shirps, maybe red tie or dressing the same or lookingthis Saye well, probably very sad, so yeah! No, I think I think, I thinkputting putting smile on people face when they open up the diise isimportant, but around the podcast and a all idea of your personal bran and allthat I'm interesting to Twenderson your regin of it. Is it wasn't your ownpersonal initiatives or was it part of the company strategy old thats allstarted et te compay, probably would have preferred not so much my dad'scompany who I was with for four years...

...before he sold and then and again I'vebeen in the copy industry for thirteen years as a sales person. At this point,so it's been quite some time, but I had four years under his wing doing my ownthing and being the Copyo Warrior and when I showed up to another company, Idid realize that I was going to get lost in this bullpen. If I wasn'tcareful and and and the company probably would have preferred that Ijust do what they asse. But when I started bringing in th big bucks and Idid within the first year, I became the number one rap at the company thatbought us and I never came off of that mantle and eventually became the VPScales for their company as well too. So I think that they were okay with what Idid. But you know they didn't give me a budget and help me promote it or I didit all on my own accord. I did it because again, nobody cares as much asyou and I wanted to change the game. I wanted to be something different, so Iknew that personal responsibility was going to come in to play and and that Iwas just going to have to make choices to run with this, even if it meantsacrificing out of my own pocket and and maybe even some days, not beingable to put gas in my car. But those days were a few and far between becausebeing authentic and going out and investing in myself. People saw that,because I was willing to do that, that they knew that I would be willing toput in the time and effort to serve them appropriately, so it translatedokay and then, when they may not have shpote you financially or you know,Ayou to stry to strategize around it. I did try to stop you. Have you OTA Tanypoint people as you to to stop doing what you are doing and concentrate onyour job or what what o o Cuat Yeah? I have. I had a waiter come to me andtell me that he didn't like the way that I was portraying myself and wantedme to change my pad. That happened to me. Obviously I'm a sales reuble, andso I didn't really but lvlove- to talk to him. I'd love to talk to that meoneof the boing Celripe. I guess all schoolboring and Yeah Dont Undeson thatEcena city sometimes will excite plans and get them to troose you over someone else rightwell, and I think the other thing is is...

...that that corporate culture wants tocontrol the way that it looks to the marketplace, but they forget that themarket place wants to business with actual human beings. Yea Don't want tocall on ate a hundred number to get a robot to dial eight differentextensions to leave four different voice bells and be transferred tentimes. That's the way that they look at it, and so I was bringing that changeinto our marketplace and having a lot of success out of it. But I understandI understand why corporate culture does it. You know you- and I, though, wouldthink it's crazy, but this is the truth. Is that even with numbers that wereEarth Shattering? And I'm sure it's true for some people? Listening to thisthat have been in my shoes as well, you know the corporate culture comes to youand says: Hey, we love your numbers, but we don't like how you're gettingthem so we're going to have to ask you to stop yeah I've non about that wo inthe past. But it's it's interesting because I think you know when a companyshouldn't be very cauhen and as operatic as a company were being, wewant to call for. The way people will speak about. Ourselvei is what we do orUS orcase, and all that so everything that is our taviss solution product. Wewant to have a little bit of confoll about that. However, when it comes tothe Indvdal, you know I guess anyone can do whatever they want. You know isand obviously for what you do is a little bit more public and ive hotplissen tool, tepisord of telling local podcast you know so so I don't know ifat some place had some crazy idea, thi some crazy stuff- I don't know- but Ithink Wen, insoon stuff. You know people cantrully step, you everybody'sgood to Hese, erally God do things on the site. You know, and I think youcontually interact with that and interject with it and then a dead ofthe day. If he's bringing the numbers and people are speaking about you,maybe it's creating jealous ot anything else, but you go so coming back to whatyou've done and and Youl expan in doing it, and you know I wantyou to ask youquestion to underson if it was a painful process, if he was reported bythe company by individual and an on Dostontat, he was not as simple as youknow. People may think. So what advice...

...would you give to a our individualsthat are planning to invest in their personal brand to drate more sense andalso is thee any platforms pactics way of doing it in basically, what are yourbest practices yeah so number one. My best advice to people is to findbentors and creative people. They can surround themselves with whendeveloping a personal brand of personal brand is not just your opinion or yourway of looking at life. It's also that you have to have this creative backbonein order to be able to translate it to everyone, because not everybody seesthe world the same way. So it's important to understand the psychologybehind a personal brand ind, the psychology behind your buyer and thecreative impact that you can truly have by thinking outside the box whenputting tyour personal brand together, and so the coloration and color schemeor Swatch of your of your brand itself. The look and the feel of when someoneheads to your website, when you hand them a business card when you radicallyeducate them on a first touch cold call, they should be able to understand whoyou are, and it should be nuanced from start to finish throughout the process,and so my advice, first and foremost is to hire people to help you that's whatI did. I surrounded myself with some of the best creative types, and I am avery imaginative person and, like I mentioned you, I played in a band andwe weren't just you know, yelling and screaming. At the top of our lungs, wewere playing very intricate music. We were creating perfection on a dailybasis, is the way that we looked at it and you have to look at your personalbrand from the same perspective you have to. You have to have an arroganceabout your personal brand, a healthy one, so that you take pride in the waythat it is portrayed to other people, but that you also have done your duediligence and had others held you accountable now, just because you thinkit's cool doesn't mean that everybody else will it's kind of my rule when itcomes to a platform. Linkin was huge...

...for me: There's not a lot of peoplepostin on linken or using linkon from a content space, and when I got on it itwas definitely less than one percent of the of the Linke and world, and becauseof that as people, I interacted with people and they added me on Linkean, orthey found me through the Algorithm, which is a beautiful thing. The linkedan algorithm is is one of the most amazing things out there for marketingand sales people. As far as being able to push out your message and your brandsuddenly I had nine thousand followers on my linke on overnight within a yearand in the process of doing so. It bled into other platforms such as myinstagram and my twitter. At the end of the day, if people want to consume yourcontent, they will I mean I even have a youtube channel that people find theygo and they watch my video ov tons of videos on there. But the idea is againthat I am creating so more than anything the tactics, the secret sauceas people like to call it. It is to actually go and do the work not just tohave a picture of the copyor warrior on a site but to have four hundred piecesof content that they can go and interact with and feel overwhelmed by,but feel educated through feelemgpowered by and again to nuants,who it is that you are so that they're in a healthy way and doctrinated byyour brand. So I wouldn't specify one one platform, though at the same time,I have friends that have built their brand on instagram or on facebook or ona different platform. But what I would say is that remember that humaninteraction is so important, even in sending a message through your socialmediaas. You are interacting with another human being and so rememberthat as you're building your brand and you're creating content thatinteracting with others, is the most important side of it. It's the action.You can't just sit back and expect people to like you. You can't build abrand in a local territory that you're dialing people on the phones that don'tknow what you look like, haven't yea seen your website have no idea who youare. You have to radically educate these folks and you have to have acompletely different mindset. Okay, any naive mistakes that you would advisepeople who are looking at reading, adot...

...tha personal grain, to avoid what arethe easy mistakes to make. I would say that all mistakes are good whencreating your versonal brand. Honestly, I made a ton of them and they helped meto learn over time what it was specifically that my marketplace didn'twant to see from me, and it also helped me to understand that that there werecertain people in my marketplace that I really didn't want to do business with.But I didn't know until I started to do these things and I jould see that sideof them that they wouldn't show you otherwise. So, but I will say this thatthe biggest mistake people make is that when they hear me say, hire somebody tohelp you and they go and they hire just anybody or their brotherinlaw and notto say that your family isn't trustworthy. The idea is is to make sure that thisis a person that you would follow, that you trust that if they have their ownpersonal brand, that you they're doing the things that you're trying to do inthe first place, yeah there's not a lot of people out there doing what theCopyo warrior does, and so it took me time to find somebody that just got it,and I found a few. You know. I A company called UNDRED. A forty twoproductions is one of my favorite people to produce my videos through,because when I write a script and send it to them, they show up and they knowexactly who I am what I want done and how it will make me happy to translateit to my consumer base. They also know when I've done things that won't work,and they tell me and right because they know they say these are look. You can'tdo it this way because of what you want to accomplish, and I trust them withthat so align yourself with folks that will hold you accountable in thebeginning again, but but also don't settle for less and again. You knowI'll, say right that mistakes are imminent and they're important, becausethey will help you to see okay. I don't need to be doing it this way, becauseyou just got to do it right. You Got Ta, you just got to suck it up and go outthere and start doing it and, if you're terrible at it in the beginning, don'tworry it'nll get better. Absolutely I'm...

...pretty agree with that. Thanks for that,thet really appreciate your time and Paspectiv todays. It's usefulrefreshing and a really enjoy the chat. So I'm sureis. You are very easy to findthat if anyone wants to learn more about you on tes on your currentproject, like the foottruck that you are current, he annin to you keepyourself Busyi like it, but IGA wats the best way to get in touch with withdajpry the best way to get in touch with MAS and anywhere on Social Linkan,I'm Dal doprey, but instagram facebook, twitter, I'm at copyor warrior. MyYoutube is copyor warrior, but also head over to cofy or WARRIORCOM and gothere now because it'll be changing within the next couple f months intosomething completely different. So go see my origins, but also you can findmy cell phone number in there. So if you really want to get a hold of me,you want to learn more about me. You want me to help you with some of yourprojects, I'm happy to reach out to me. Well, you just got yourself ar newinstagram for Toine, my serf. So there you go so great, so again, many things foryour time today, really good to have you on the show axcellent. Thank you somuch for having meon, I appreciate you. operatics has redefined the meaning ofrevenue generation for technology companies worldwide, while thetraditional concepts of building and managing inside sales teams in househas existed for many years. Companies are struggling with the lack of focus,agility and scale required in today's fast and complex world of enterprisetechnology sales. Seeow operatics can help your company accelerate pipelineat operatics. Dot Net you've been listening to be to be revenueacceleration to ensure that you never miss an episode subscribe to the showin your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening until nexttime.

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