B2B Revenue Acceleration
B2B Revenue Acceleration

Episode · 2 years ago

30: Drive Sales by Investing in Your Personal Brand w/ Dale Dupree

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

What does being a major signed heavy metal musician and an amazing salesperson  have to do with each other?

Everything.

Dale Dupree is widely known as the Copier Warrior as well as being the host of the Selling Local Podcast and leader of the Sales Rebellion. Dale understands personal branding in a way that many in the corporate world do not.

On a recent episode of The B2B Revenue Acceleration Podcast, Dale joined me to discuss personal branding. Particularly the critical need for authenticity, transparency, and creativity.

While it may cost you in the short term, these branding traits are critical. They will set you apart and drive more sales.

He explains how developing his authentic brand has led to more closed deals, the push back he has received from corporate culture, despite record sales, his best practices for personal brand building, and how all mistakes are good.

You were listening to be to berevenue acceleration, a podcast dedicated to helping software executives stay on the cutting edgeof sales and marketing in their industry. Let's get into the show. Hi, welcome to be to be a revenue exceleration. My Name is opinion withyou and I'm up today with del Dupre, also known as the Cup your Wayo. Are You doing today? They doing great. Thanks for having meon. No problem at tour. So today we will be talking about frommuting your personal brand to increase sex. But before we get into details,can you please introduce yourself to all agience and tell US small about whys?The Cup your wire? Absolutely, I'm happy to so. My Name's DaleDupree. I live and have been born and raised, which is unheard ofby most people in Orlando, Florida. Typically people that are from Florida camefrom a cold state and they came here to get away from the snow,but I was actually born in a hospital down the street from where I live. The copyer ware. His origins start with my father. In one thousandnine hundred and eighty four. My father found it a small business. Itwas a copyer firm. And then I was born in one thousand nine hundredeighty five, and so people like to say that toner was running through myblood from the day that I came out of the room. So inevitably Iwent and I worked with my father throughout my upbringing and I actually ended up, around the time I was seventeen, touring the world with my band,who was assigned to a major record label. We played heavy metal music, whicha lot of people here that and then look at me and go what. Yeah, but about the time I was twenty one, twenty two,I decided that the music scene wasn't where I wanted to spend the rest ofmy career, that I wanted to create something a little bit bigger than andwhat I had done in that scene as well too, I wanted to honormy father's legacy be a little bit closer to my family, and so Imade the choice to come back and and work for my dad, which waseasy at the same time too, so because I knew my dad would hireme, because I would just tell my mom if he wouldn't in the firstplace and get him in trouble. So so I spent the next about tenyears with my father, working alongside of him in the copyer industry and eventhrough an acquisition when we sold the company.

And that's that's me in a nutshell. Okay, so they I know that you've been walking for them asa cookie records you just mentioned, but many people, we also knew youas being the host of the selling local podcast was it will be familiar withyou as the leader of the sense rebellion. So I'd like to learn more aboutour running these power and projects alongside your daily joke and you to drivemore sales, more reputation to what was you? I think it's a greatquestion because it was one of the first focuses that I had to have inthat if we're passionate about something and we want to make a career out ofit, but we also have these five six other things we want to do, we can get lost inside of that. And so for me, who thecopyer warrior is and what the selling local podcasts and also what the salethe concept of the sales rebellion is is that they all compliment back to tome to deal dupre when and at the end of the day, that's wholays down and goes to sleep. And so when I started the selling localpodcast, because I decided that I wanted to start speaking to my audience alittle bit more, and my audience being my buyers. I wanted them tosee deeper into my thought process as a salesperson and I thought that it wouldbuild rapport with them. And so in selling local, I tell my storiesabout my sales triumphs and failures. I talked about my my theories behind sales. I talked about a lot of different things that typically we would just wantother salespeople to hear, but not me, because I'm an open book and Ilike transparency and I love vulnerability. I think that it builds a betterrelationship and I think that people buy from those that they like and they trust. So so I decided to start selling local so that people can see moreof my culture and get that look, you know, behind the curtain,the sales rebellion. You know, I started earning the nickname of being theleader of the sales rebellion just because my whole life really I've been a rebel, you know, from the time that I was in music to the tocoming home with for my father, I've always justin belt against the norm.So I wasn't about to say Av Midwood...

...and rebellion seems to be like goingway together. Yes, they do. So I again, I just I'verun with with that over the years as well too. But recently I havemade a transition inside of my career that I haven't announced to anybody yet,and I'm essentially I'm running a little bit further and deeper into the thought ofbeing the leader of the seals rebellion instead of it just being a concept.And again I'll be announcing soon what I'm doing. But I think I preferthat most people get imaginative with what's going on. I like the experience behindwork and and life. I like the thought of it being an adventure.I like I don't like the doll and the mundane and the bland. Andso I've been launching this new project for about thirty days and people are messagingme gaily and going hated, I miss your announcement, but the truth isis that I'm going to run it until people are so curious that they're aboutto explode. I like it. Oh, that's the Tis a fall audience.So he good. Yeah, everybody should follow you now on the dailybasis. Ree fresh, refresh, refresh. Okay, good, but obviously knowthis the sending real code and this set is rebillion of them. Theactually generated business for you. You can can you say to tell Agians fora probably me. Okay, I've actually cruised that deal. All that pieceof business came from me being out done, bringing up my own bread. Yes, absolutely so. The and the copyer Warrior in general as a brandhas also been huge for me because if you think about copiers, most peoplewill say, well, that's a commodity product that twenty people sell in myarea and they knock on my door or they call my phone all the time. And then the most annoying, obnoxious people that I can think of,although there are some good ones out there. I'm not bashing all copy yourselves reps, but because of our heart industrious is such a commodity we are.We are trained and taught to dial Dow Dow, Dow Dow until we findan opportunity and then press as hard as we can full court to get thatdeal done so that we can cash a check and then get to the next, get to the next, get to the next. So for me,I decided to slow that down and I said, wow, you know,I'm going to create the copyer warrior. And so when I walk in andI'm the twenty guy out of the other...

...nineteen that show up before me,that's they will look at me differently, that I will cause curiosity, thatI will be this undeniable force and my industry for my buyer and for noother reason, and not for my boss, not for my company, but formy buyer, to serve my buyer, to give them an experience and tohelp them to understand the mists of the industry, all the things thatthey have known to be, quote unquote true for so long that really arefalse. And so, using the selling local podcast, I did occasionally havea guest on here and there and still do, that will be aligned withme so that I can talk to their audience and and maybe even speak withtheir company a little bit more about what I do. So the idea ofthe podcast is again that to help people to see a little bit closer anddeeper into who I am, but because people enjoy listening to it, especiallyin my area here, when I knock on your door, people know thecopyr Warrior, they listen to the PODCAST, they've heard of it still from billion. So it's been both good with inbound and in my ouebound efforts andhelping people to recognize me. I think he's very refreshing because there's orders forsome. So I would say a touch of humor in the way you goabout it, which which I think is very important in the community, potentiallyboring market, if you will. Yeah, so being a little bit different,I'm trying to search for the world eccentric, should I say. Ithink that's there is what absolutely like. Absolutely it's just it's just refreshing.It's just refreshing because you know people would like on the personal level and Ithink that's that's that's makes the whole difference. Dosus yours legate coming white shirts,but maybe Red Tie? All dressing the same, all looking the same, will probably very sad. So yeah, I think, I think. Ithink putting putting a smile on people face when the open up the diceis important. But around the podcast and and at all idea of your personalbrand and all that, I'm interesting you to tondersand the origin of it is. It wasn't your own personal initiatives that was it part of the company strategyI would that all started and a company probably would have preferred, not somuch my dad company, who I was...

...with for four years before he sold, and then and again. I've been in the copy industry for thirteen yearsas a salesperson at this point, so it's been quite some time. ButI had four years under his wing doing my own thing and being a copyerwarrior. When I showed up to another company, I did realize that Iwas going to get lost in this bullpen if I wasn't careful and and thecompany probably would have preferred that I just do what they ass but when Istarted bringing in the big box, and I did within the first year,I became the number one rapid company that bought us and I never came offof that mantle and eventually became the VP of sales for their company as welltoo. So I think that they were okay with what I did, butyou know, they didn't give me a budget and help me promote it,or I did it all on my own accord. I did it because,again, nobody cares as much as you and I wanted to change the game. I wanted to be something different. So I knew that personal responsibility wasgoing to come in to play and and that I was just going to haveto make choices to run with this, even if it meant sacrificing out ofmy own pocket and and maybe even, some days, not being able toput gas in my car. But those days were few and far between,because being off and pick and going out and investing in myself, people sawthat, because I was willing to do that, that they knew that Iwould be willing to put in the time and effort to serve them appropriately.So it translated. Okay. And and when they may not to supported youfinancially or you know, I could just try to strategize around it. Idid try to stop you. I've got at any point, people as Youtube, to stop doing what you're are doing and concentrate on your job. Orwhat he what he quotes. Yeah, I have. I have had aleader come to me and tell me that he didn't like the way that Iwas portraying myself and wanted me to change my pad. That happened to me. Obviously I'm a sales rebel and so I didn't really listen to it,but I'd love it, how enough, to talk to him. I'd loveto talk to that my own one of the boring center is right, Iguess old school boring. And Yeah, don't hold know some that the centricitysometimes would it excited plans and get them to to choose you of our someoneelse. Right. Well, and I think the other thing is is thatthat corporate culture wants to control the way...

...that it looks to the market place, but they forget that the market place wants to do business with actual humanbeings. Yeah, don't want to call eight hundred number to get a robotto dial eight different extensions, to leave four different voicemails and be transferred tentimes. That's the way that they look at it. And so I wasbringing that change into our market place and having a lot of success out ofit. But I understand. I understand why corporate culture does it. Youknow, you and II, though, would think it's crazy. But thisis the truth. Is that even with numbers that were Earth Shattering, andI'm sure it's true for some people listening to this that have been in myshoes as well, you know, the corporate culture comes to you and says, Hey, we love your numbers, but we don't like how you're gettingthem. So we're going to have to ask you to stop. Yeah,I thought about that rig in the past, but it's a it's interesting because Ithink, you know, when a company should be very careful and andUS operatic as a company while being we want to confort the way people willspeak about us. Elle sees what we do. All use OCAS and allthat. So everything that is all the VC's solution product. We want alittle bit of controtb all that. However, when it comes to the individual,you know, I guess anyone can do whatever they wants. You know, is and obviously for what you do is a little bit more public.And I've not listen to all the episode of telling local podcast of you knowso, so I don't know if it's some place you had some crazy idea. These some crazy stuff. I don't know. But I think when inShan stuff, you know, people can truly stuff you. Everybody's got tobe is everything. Go do things on the site, you know, andI think you can truly interact with that and all interject with it. Andthen, I end of the day, if it's bringing the numbers and peopleare speaking about you, you maybe it's creating journalism on anythingens. But thereyou go. So, coming back to what you've done and and your experiencein doing it, and you know I want you to ask you question toOndstan if it was a painful process, if you was supported by the company, by individual and an undostomity, was not as simple as you know peoplemay think. So what advice would you...

...give to us or individuals that areplanning to invest in the personal brand to drive more sels, and also,is there any platforms, tactics, way of doing it in in basically,what are your best practices? Yeah, so number one, my best adviceto people's to find mentors and creative people they can surround themselves with when developinga personal brand. A personal brand is not just your opinion or your wayof looking at life, it's also that you have to have this creative backbonein order to be able to translate it to everyone, because not everybody seesthe world the same way. So it's important to understand the psychology behind apersonal brand, in the psychology behind your buyer and the creative impact that youcan truly have by thinking outside the box when putting your personal brand together.And so the coloration of and color scheme or Swatch of your of your branditself, the look in the feel of when someone heads to your website,when you hand them the business card, when you radically educate them on afirst touch cold call, they should be able to understand who you are andit should be nuanced from start to finish throughout the process, and so myadvice, first and foremost, is to hire people to help you. That'swhat I did. I surrounded myself with some of the best creative types andI am a very imaginative person and, like I mentioned to you, Iplayed in a band and we weren't, just, you know, yelling andscreaming at the top of our lungs. We were playing very intricate music.We were creating perfection on a daily basis. Is the way that we looked atit, and you have to look at your personal brand from the sameperspective. You have to you have to have an arrogance about your personal brand, a healthy one, so that you take pride in the way that itis portrayed to other people, but that you also have done your due diligenceand had others held you accountable. Now, just because you think it's cool,doesn't mean that everybody else will. Is kind of my rule when itcomes to a platform. Linkedin was huge for me. There's not a lotof people posting on Linkedin. Are Using...

...linkedin from a content space, andwhen I got on it it was definitely less than one percent of the ofthe linkedin world. And because of that, as people, I interacted with peopleand they added me on Linkedin or they found me through the Algorithm,which is a beautiful thing. The linkedin algorithm is is one of the mostamazing things out there for for marketing and sales people, as far as beingable to push out your message and your brand. Suddenly I had nine thousandfollowers on my linkedin overnight, within a year, and in the process ofdoing so, it bled into other platforms such as my instagram and my twitter. At the end of the day, if people want to consume your content, they will. I mean I even have a youtube channel that people find, they go and they watch my video. I have tons of videos on there, but the idea is, again, that I am creating. So,more than anything, the tactics, the secret sauce, as people liketo call it, it, is to actually go and do the work notjust to have a picture of the copyer warrior on a site, but tohave four hundred pieces of content that they can go and interact with and feeloverwhelmed by, but feel educated through, feel empowered by and and again tonew wance who it is that you are so that they're in a healthy wayand doctrinated by your brand. So I wouldn't specify one one platform, thoughat the same time I have friends that have built their brand on instagram oron facebook or on a different platform. But what I would say is thatremember that human interaction is so important, even in sending a message through yoursocial media, as you are interacting with another human being. And so rememberthat as you're building your brand and you're creating content, that interact team withothers is the most important side of it. It's the action. You can't justsit back and expect people to like you. You can't build a brandin a local territory that you're dialing people on the phones that don't know whatyou look like, haven't, yeah, seen your website, have no ideawho you are. You have to radically educate these folks and you have tohave a completely different mindset. Okay, any naive mistakes that you would advisepeople who are looking at reading of the...

...personal brand to avoid? But what'son the easy misticks who make? I would say that all mistakes are goodwhen when creating your personal brand. Honestly, I made a ton of them andthey helped me to learn over time what it was specifically that my marketplace didn't want to see from me, and it also helped me to understandthat that there were certain people in my market place that I really didn't wantto do business with. But I didn't know until I started to do thesethings. Yeah, you see that side of them that they wouldn't show youotherwise. So, but I will say this that the biggest mistake people makeis that they when they hear me say, hire somebody to help you, andthey go and they hire just anybody or their brotherinlaw. And not tosay that your family isn't trustworthy branded right, but you need to basically, theidea is is to make sure that this is a person that you wouldfollow, that you trust that, if they have their own personal brand,that you they're doing the things that you're trying to do in the first place. Yeah, there's not a lot of people out there doing what the copyor warrior does, and so it took me time to find somebody that justgot it, and I found a few. You know, I a company calledone hundred and forty two productions, is one of my favorite people toproduce my videos through, because when I write a script and send it tothem, they show up and they know exactly who I am, what Iwant done and how it will make me happy to translate it to my consumerbase. They also know when I've done things that won't work and they tellme in the and right because they know. They say, these are book youcan't do it this way because of what you want to accomplish, andI trust them with that. So align yourself with folks that will hold youaccountable in the beginning again, but but also don't settle for less. Andagain, you know, I'll say ray that mistakes are imminent and they're importantbecause they will help you to see, okay, I don't need to bedoing it this way, because you just gotta do it right. You gotit. You just got to suck it up and go out there and startdoing it. And if you're terrible out of in the beginning, don't worry, it'll get better. Absolutely I'm really...

...agree with that, sincefor that theyreally appreciate your time and despective. Today's it's just for the refreshing and I'mreally Drei the chets. So I'm sure you are very easy to find thatif anyone wants to learn more about you on this, on your current projectand like the foot truck that you are current here, anning for you.You keep yourself busy. I like it, but I did what wasn't the bestway to get in touch with they did you pret the best way toget in touch with me as anywhere on Social Linkedin, I'm Dale too,prey, but instagram, facebook, twitter, I'm at Copyr Warrior. My Youtubeis copyr warrior, but also head over to Copyr WARRIORCOM and go therenow, because it'll be changing within the next couple of months into something completelydifferent. So go see my origins, but also you can find my cellphone number and there. So if you really want to get ahold of me, you want to learn more about me, you want me to help you withsome of your projects, I'm happy to reach out to me. Well, you're just good. She'll send for a new instagram for the one myserve, so that you go so great. So again, many things for yourthing today. Really good to have youngdusual excellent. Thank you so muchfor having me on. I appreciate you. operatics has redefined the meaning of revenuegeneration for technology companies worldwide. While the traditional concepts of building and managinginside sales teams inhouse has existed for many years, companies are struggling with alack of focus, agility and scale required in today's fast and complex world ofenterprise technology sales. See operatics can help your company accelerate pipeline at operatics dotnet. You've been listening to be to be revenue acceleration. To ensure that younever miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player.Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (120)