B2B Revenue Acceleration
B2B Revenue Acceleration

Episode · 1 year ago

79. Marketers, Never Forget Your Why!

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As marketers, our why should be the foundation of everything we do.

But we all too often lose sight of our why behind promoting our products and services.

In this episode, I interview Rob Hughes, VP and Head of Marketing for EU at Automation Anywhere, about the reasons marketers should hold on to their why more tightly than ever.

What we talked about: Keeping your why at the forefront, using your why to shape messaging for prospects & customers, Vision is more fulfilling than product, Linking your work to societal change will reignite your passion

 

To hear this interview and many more like it, subscribe to The B2B Revenue Acceleration Podcast on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or on our website.

You're listening to be tob revenue acceleration, a podcast dedicated to helping software executives stay on the cutting edge of salesand marketing in their industry. lets get into the show. Welcome to betob revenue acceleration. My name is Dan See Brook and I'm here today withRock Hughes, VP and head of marketing for EU at automation anywhere. Morning, rob how you doing today morning there very well, thanks our first sayof official lockdown. Everybody starting to face up to the challenges of this.Now I'm planning on growing a beard and, as being a it's never been abetter time. So you know, we're trying our this, but firstday and everybody's everybody still buoyant at moments. So really absolutely nothing. We're allin the same boat together. I would say that I would try andgrow a beard, but I think I'm going to need longer than three weeks. So so I don't think I'll go down that route. But hopefully wecan know with this podcast provide some some some content ands and some easy listeningfor people to receive when they're not head down at work throughout the day.So the topic today, rob is, is around marketing and markets. NeverForget your why. But before we get into that conversation, could you pleaseintroduce yourself to our audience and give us a feel for your company and automationanywhere? Sure so, I run marketing for Europe for automotion anywhere. Ijoined the company from an analyst background. I was in the analyst community forfifteen years and automation anywhere came around, as all vendors do for all emeralsthouses. Everybody Pitches Your Business and tries to gain some insiders to had agame, pit competitive advantage and understand what the markets doing and where the opportunitiesmight lie. And our PA came along as a sector really and it was. It's one of those technologies that I couldn't find a business hole in asto why we wouldn't do it or why company wouldn't start to automate or beforced to automate. You know, the...

...macro environment is driving us to bemuch more efficient. I mean this recent issue with the with the virus andso on. It's just emphasize that even further. But you know, youhave to have some kind of straight through processing goals in place. Otherwise we'renot going to get to, we're not going to be able to deliver theservices and the products that customers and our partners and our ecosystem is used todelivery with the same amount of people. So as the the world population beginsto peak, we're going to end up with a lot more old people anda lot fewer young people to do the work, and so we'll have morepeople to serve and less people to do the work. That's one of themacro drivers around it, as well as companies like Amazon and new digital nativeorganizations coming in and changing the way that businesses are run. So, afterfifteen years of listening to lots of business pictures, I work up one morningand said Ourpa is the is going to be the future, and I've gotto the side, whether I talk about it or whether I get involved withit. And I got involved directly with automotion anywhere. So automation anywhere isone of the leaders in the marketplace and at that time it was still oneof the leaders in the market place. It seems years ago, but itwas only three and a half years ago that I joined, and I joinedbecause of the vision of automotion anywhere in any new technology organization that I thinkthe leadership of the leading companies within those those markets. It is critical todefine who's going to be the thought leader in the space. And I joinedautomotion anywhere because I believe in the vision that the company has and I believein their in the leadership, their experience and getting us the vision. Sothat's a little bit about me and a little bit about the company. Yeah, and I guess marketing in a high growth sector like ourpa brings a lotof different elements to it. There's a lot of different challenges. There's anelement of maybe not creating a category but kind of reinventing your category around automationand and and that sort of message around intelligent automation. So from marketing spectrum, I'm sure got your hands full.

Now, Robin A, in recentconversation you've been telling us that you are a strong advocate of the transactional approachmarketing and actually that's all about making your communications, your campaigns, your messaging, ensuring it's a line to your companies overall mission and values. Now,can you elaborate on that further for our audience and tell us what tell usby that and also give us a feel for why marketers need to really keeptheir kind of corporate and an individual why at the forefront of their mind whennot sure. And I think, and you know, the transactional bit thatyou mentioned there is important, as it's the transactional components that we build outmarketing, and by transactional I mean we do an event, we run awhip and are we run some contents, indication we just placed as these areall levers and they're all transactional components to get us to where we need toget to. But I see, I come from a predominantly a sales background, quite high level sales, quite big deals, advisory type work rather thanproduct so you're almost having to invent your own pitch. You're, you know, in the information space. It's all about the stories that you tell,and that's why marketing sits so comfortably with me, because in that consultancy spaceyou kind of have to create your own marketing in your own ideas, becauseyou're selling intellectual property and in reality and you're selling a vision. You're notselling something hard or a product or a something that's can touch and feel anduse. You're selling an idea, approach, advice, etc. That offered mea suppose a different approach to the marketing component and saying when I steppedup a step back from what marketing this traditionally doing, which is supporting sales. And we've heard this terminology around market led organizations and marketing their companies andso on, and but nobody, not nobody's the wrong way to put it, but very few companies seem to adopt...

...that and run their marketing organization builton insight data. They they based it on lots of transactional data. Thisevent really work for me. I ran a Webin are around it and weran a blog at the end of it and we ran a whole lot oftransactional meeting maker type of functions. For us, that's those those transactional componentsadd up into a program and the program was focused around certain things. Thatmight be focusing on your target account list, that might be displacement, it mightbe a number of different things, but that program will run. Formost people call that a campaign. Our campaigns actually run annually. So theannual idea is that we and we work in vertical so we look at verticalmarkets, we understand those markets, we understand our target accountless within those markets. We understand how we need to get to them and we spend around sixmonths every year just gathering data to make sure that we understand we're aiming oursales team at at the right functions, at the right opportunities and at peoplewho want to engage with us. The idea of the why, and youknow why this is important, and having an overarching umbrella around this allows usto take every of the transactional components and put them into the programs that arerequired and then run those programs in line with the specific campaigns. But itallows us to all, I'm very closely with sales and we don't marketing doesn'thand over to sales, and I think that's the same and most organizations actually, and that you know, if you think about how marketing influences a specificperson, let's say it's a buy or an influence or it just a user, developer, whatever, from the moment they are exposed to your brand,from that very first touch point, they could pick up a newspaper and readabout you, they could download a white paper, they could go on tothe website, whatever it might be, the moment they touch your brand,until really that moment that person disappears out of your ecosystem. It's marketing responsibilityto influence the messaging, make sure that...

...they have the information that they need, make sure that ourselves organization is aligned to be able to give them whatthey need when they need it, and if we tie it into the overallcampaign, we understand their work world a lot better because we're listening to them. The programs are aligned for our business goals and the tactics are put togetherto be able or the various tactical approaches are put together in line with theoverall achievement of where we need to get to. So sorry for the theconfusing explanation, but hopefully that gives you an idea of why we look atthe the why you have to figure out why we're doing this in the firstplace. Understand that we own the customer from beginning to end and every singletime we touch them we have an opportunity to either influence them one way oranother, either positively or negatively, and our job is to own that wholejour jurney from beginning to end, and every transactional touch point that we havehas to be part of a wider story. So that they don't feel as ifthere's multiple message is coming from all over the place and then also allowsus to walk our sales team in and support ourselves team through the whole lifetimeof the customer experience, whether that the one off purchase or whether it betwenty year relationship. It's our job to help sales and and and help customersupport and services and everything else that the business touches with our customers. Sowhen we're talking about the transactional pieces adding up to the Y, that's kindof the approach that we take. Okay, that's really interesting take on sort ofbuilding relationships with customers out of interest. Does that approach remain the same bothto new prospect and also existing customers? Or would you? Would you,based on that sort of process you've just described, their take a differentapproach to marketing to your distant customer base versus new prospects for that position purposes? Yeah, I mean you prospects is there's always a different it's a differentecosystem. The problems over, the problems that Compani s face always the same. You know, a lot of us...

...get hung up on how will wedo on the Gardener Magic quadrant? Or wards we've received, or how manytimes were number one on whatever quadrants and how many times were mentioned. Thenthen we tend to go to market and jump up and down and say look, one hundred and one one and we could all these posts. I thinkyou know quite often companies are way to focus on what they do and notenough focus on what the outcome of the markets that we're serving is. Andwe've got to relate our products and services to solve that problem, not walkin and say look, we build robots as and they're cool. So Ithink all organizations are struggling with this idea that product, the product, isgoing to sell it for you, and I see a lot of marketing.We're selling is happening in the marketing process. Now it's really about supplying companies withthe information they need in a professional manner that they trust your source andsay these are, this is a company that I want to come and talkto, whether that's a prospect or a customer. With a customer you shouldhave a lot higher level of trust anyway, and the message should still be thesame. It's about solving problems for the customer. It's not about theproduct. Now the channels that we use and noise will be different depending onwhether it's a prospect or a customer, because you can swamp your customers withtoo much marketing information. You have to have a very different type of approach. It maybe abm one to one or a depending on the company, maybeone too onto few. So we tend not to look at different strategies ordifferent messaging. The messaging should be the same. The message you should bea lot about customer outcome and success. It shouldn't be a lot about ourproduct and I think that that shouldn't differ between customer and prospect. But wecan tell the stories coming from customers. We we use a lot of auser case studies and so on, and sometimes we have to anonymize them.But it's really about the Oddi of the possible, because they in our market. As you said, it's a new market. We kind of I don'tlike the idea of creating the market.

I think it's the wrong way toput it. stears me if I'm on this, but it's much more aboutadapting to the market and leading it from the thought leadership perspective, as thishow we try to see it with a surf and not the wave, thewaves behind us and we're trying to stay on top of the ways to makesure that we can see what's coming. Yeah, and I think that's aninteresting take in it. Regarding your market, I mean I think the idea aroundautomating things, in automation in general, has has has been around for along time, but OURPA is kind of the next phase of that andhow I agree. I'm not sure you're having to completely create a market.I think the market is people believe the markets are. It's kind of aboutreinventing it and bring a new, intelligent version of automation to the forefront ofpeople of mind. Now you're talking earlier on in our conversation around your transitionfrom a from a sales background into more of a consultancy and analyst area throughtractually joining automation anywhere in the marketing team, and I think you spoke about thefact that you joined them because it was a case of do you keeptalking about it or do you get involved in it? And I suppose thereason you go involved in it you really believed in in the technology and theimpact that you're having on on on businesses and on people's lives. Now thatthat's an interesting taken, an interesting journey. I'm sure a lot of people canrelate to that. How from your perspective, how important is it forpeople to join the company that they can personally relate to, from a froma mission or vision perspective, or do you think it is possible to actuallythat sales marketing professional? Perhaps I don't care and it's just about they seea big opportunity to and a lot of money for EACHAM for example. Doyou think it's really about doing something that you deeply care about? Yeah,that's that's a great question. And and you know it's weird as you getall the different things matter to you. When you're young, you know theM series cars the biggest focus in your life as a young man, let'ssay. But as you get older, you know it, you start torealize that once you get stuff and you...

...know this is what it goes waybeyond marketing and sales. This is how we love our life. You know, you realize that the more stuff doesn't make you happy and it's the littlethings that you want to work towards. And you know, I've been luckyenough to be pretty successful in a lot of companies and with fantastic people aroundme, the analyst community, surrounding me with PhDs and brain boxes that II'll never ever have that opportunity again, with the professors from London School ofEconomics, with my colleagues, you know. So you're balancing ideas and thought processesoffo and over time you generate a wider understanding of potential in life andwhat your potential might be. And I think it's markets as most. Alot of people get into marketing because it's seen as creative, but now thatI've been in the marketing space for a while and I see the creative bitis actually a bit of a dying art and I see everything based on analyticsand pulling leavers in a digital everybody talks about digital being key. If yourstory is not good enough and you don't believe in it, you don't havethe passion for an you don't understand the impact that you're trying to have andyou can't relate your product to that, you really really struggle to have anykind of real enthusiasm behind what you do or how you run your teams arehow you do your job. Now it sounds admirable. Admirable to say andvery lofty actually to say. Only take a job that you really love.You know, we see this all over the place, but I think throughtime you know you have to do your warts and all, you have toyou know crap, get the callousers and do the hard work and learn throughexperiences. Is, in my experiences, is been the best way to learn. When your head enough times and you stop doing stupid things. But andit's never the first time that you stop, trust me, it's you always giveit another go. But I think you know. For me, Ilooked at this what makes you you? I looked at Oppia, at themarket, and you said, yeah, we're not creating the market, andthe problem with us is we're so successful in this market place. We grow, we double our business and we've been...

...doing it for over ten years now, year on year, and we do it not with ease. We workhard to get there and when you get to a certain size double it becomesa refect, your real challenge. But with the goal behind you and withthe belief that we're making the right impact, then you can change the world.And for me it was looking at automation, anywhere, looking at Darpamarket and saying if I look at the macro world, I mean I've alreadymentioned that we don't have enough people. We lose twenty eight million people outof the workforce in the next forty years just in Europe. Now that's goingto be a nearly twelve percent of our workforce is going to disappoint. Sowe have to do more with less. Being a digital company. If you'renot a digital company, I don't know what business you're in. Every everybody'sdigital and for maybe not in their operations, but and they go to market.Everybody has digital offerings, where it's websites or APPS or whatever it mightbe. Everybody's got their foot in the water. There the challenge. Thatcan't be sad as we didn't the majority of our operations is not digital.It's based on legacy and our PA can step in and modernize all of that. But for me it's much more about I've seen so many people in mycareer, really brilliant people that are doing very mundane jobs, people with NBA'sand in India running call centers and or sitting on the on that another sideof the phone, and then we wonder why we have high atrition and needs, and India specifically, because we have hugely talented people do very munday jobs. There's outsourced to India. So my mess for less. That can't carryon. We've got a free up intellectual capacity of humans. We've got tochange this. There's virus is really exposed us our supply chains or exposed there'sa there's a hard drug, for example in the US. I think saidseven hundred ninetyzerole people are on this drug and it's only manufactured in China.Now that's not pointing fingers at anybody, it's saying that there's a weakness andour supply chain and if a supply chains get shut down, forget about thevirus. The seven hundred Ninetyzero people that are relying on that drug to keepthem alive on now at risk. So...

...the way that we business is haveis going to have to change. There the whole market is is, orthe whole world is is pivoting at the moment to try and understand how dowe stop this type of thing in the future, how do we build failsafe in and I think the only way to do that is to free peopleup to actually be people and think and contribute and just add value rather thanjust do things. So I think over time, for me they're, youknow, the the golden light was the world has got to change. Theeconomic models of the world are changing because of the way that digital companies were. People are trying to companies are trying different things. They're trying things I'venever done before. We've been poking at Agile for a long time now.We're all working from home at Metas for than ever, how we think,how we operate. So I think that from a mission perspective, you haveto believe that you're doing. In my in my case, I'm looking atand thinking this software can actually free people to actually have interesting lives rather thanjust do the same thing over and over and over again and repeat it andetc. We never release the potential of humans and we're going to have toas we move forward and we face with these massive ecological changes, these massivechallenges that we've got with this virus and you know, we don't know ifthis is the last we're going to see of these types of things. SoI think moving forward, a company of people are smart. People have toalign themselves to good causes. They have to have a societal impact if they'rereally going to make a change, because you know that. And lastly,everybody's on their soapbox. So everybody's got a comment about your business. Youknow how organizations behave. It's critique constantly and companies can be made or broken, you know if the right people or the right influences are saying the wrongthings about them. So all the right things about them. So we're muchmore interwove and I think you have to be socially responsible and we have tofigure out how your product or service can tie into doing something positive rather thanjust making money. I know it sounds...

...a bit lofty, but it almosteverything, in every product in the world besides the obvious ones, can havesome kind of positive impact on the environments that we serve. And as forme, understanding what that is and linking it that, that helps me decidewhere I want to work and where I want to throw my efforts. Forsure, absolutely. And to your point, some most example you're using around,you know today and the virus and how much that bringing it to theto reality for a lot of people that haven't sort of thought about the impactof if we had something like this. How can we very quickly work fromhome. I mean there's a lot of businesses that are benefiting very nicely fromthe current circumstances based on exactly that collaboration tools or communication tools or security providersthat enable remote working so so easily. But actually I think, to yourpoint it is lofty, but I think situations like we've seen ourselves in recentlyabsolutely will mean that the sort of general working pattern and process is going tohave to change and down and, to your point, companies like yourself aprobably world placed to impact that. We look at automation anywhere. As acompany you're going through hyper growth, as you spoke about there, and aswe see with a lot of businesses, they can begin to lose their waya little bit as that happens and can keep that consistency when scaling is achallenge. Have you seen that as a challenge at automation anywhere and from whatare some of the things that you guys are doing to ensure that alignment andconsistency around your around your messaging, around your why? Really, how doyou ensure that that still there as you keep growing? I think we're stickingto we've got a frilly extensive five year plan in place that's not actually comingto the end of its the end of its activation. But you know,when you're building a company that's going as quickly. And just to put itin perspective, I always employed two hundred and seventy three and we're now twostars and nothing, two thousand six hundred...

...employees the last time I check.That's not including the developers and the tempt staff that work with US and supportus at CITRI's. So and that's happened in three years, just over threeyears. So and we're now, and what I think we're in ninety twocountries where active with sales and we're over fifty companies. We have officers nowand when I started we had no officers in Europe at all. We nowhave three hundred fifty people in Europe and we have offices in London, Paris, Frankfurt, Munich, Warsaw, Milan, which is closed, of it everywhereclose at the moment, and Madrid, Netherlands. And I think I've coveredeverything in Europe. I'm not one hundred percent. I think the MosSwitzerland, we have an office in Switzerland, as wrong to you. So we'vegrown pretty quickly and and you know, I think the the challenge on scalingand consistency is always, you know, keep your true north. Decide whatkind of company you want to be in a different everybody knows, atdifferent growth levels you require different sets of skills to get you there. Youknow, as you're moving, as you become more corporate, you need tohire a different CFO, for example, you need to hire a different teamof people that around compliance implement. We're implementing huge systems from workday through tofull implementation, full reimplementations of sales force, etc. And you need a wholeteam of skilled internal IT services guys to be able to build it.But the way to keep everybody, I suppose, kind of on track isis having your true north and just re to rating that. So we havea set of values that we live by and we try and will we runby OK ours as well. I don't know if you're familiar with their booksof objectives and key results, and those are all broken down from our CEOright the way down to me and my team and everybody else. We allhave a set of Ok ours and those are really the transactional stuff that we'retrying to achieve and they all kind of...

...total lot to make sure that meor has what he needs when he walks into the board meeting. It's on. So it's not easy. You have to have a plan B, ifI'm honest, you know, because plan a very seldom works or it neverworks out the way you wanted to explain. It's always plan a, version twentysix by the time you get to the end of the journey. Ifyou if you still with your plot plan A, we've been lucky and thatthe markets very, very active. So you know, we've tried things.We've got huge product development teams. We've got a huge amount of our revenue. I can't give the exact percentage, but a large percentage of our ownyou goes back into R and D for product development. So we're our PAis today is credible. It's almost the AI or three years ago. Youknow, the technology doesn't get done or get smaller as a technology. GetSmarty. You need to step up and extend your product offering into you know, rather than just task what emotion. You need full process, auto motion. You need to incorporate AI and analytics. We've just built a BOT called discovery, but that actually runs across your systems and then builds the Bot automaticallyfor you, so you don't actually have to have any kind of internal development. Just plug and play, come kind of stuff. So I think yougot to keep your true north and hyperscale. You got to know where you're going, no matter which route you have to take to get there, becausethose change all the time. So and under communications super important. It's themost important thing, I think, in any business. Clear communication as towhere we need to go and you need to spend a lot of time communicatingto the team internally to make sure that everybody's focused and one hundred percent focused. I suppose I'm where you need to get to, otherwise you're not goingto get there. So communication, you're true north, and those are probablythe two most important points. I think in any scaling organization it's just keepkeep your direction and show you flexibility on...

...you know how you're going to getthere and and you know, if you in any hyperscale business, people tendto work a lot longer hours just to be able to get there. Youknow, as a lot of entrepreneurial type people, that you're play especially inthe early days, to get stuff up and running and some of them areworking sixteen nine days, six days a week for two or three years ata time, and you have to have a bigger purpose. You have tohave a better true north than just are we're going to IPO. You know, very few people are motivated by that. So I think when you're younger,Ip is very attractive, but after a while you realize the complexities aroundand your way for as much as you can. But yeah, it's that'slet me stop there. I think true door that flexibility and being and havinga decent, purposeful help get there in hyperscale. Okay, that's certain.That's a really interesting spector on it. And it's final point around that isyou mentioned about having a true north. But in a in a scaling hypergrowthcompany, do you ever see that there's a an opportunity or an instance whereactually you're your true north or your why around what you're doing can change?Is that something that you could see happening, or would that mean that you actuallyperhaps haven't found it true north in the first place? That's you're absolutelyright. And what I mean by true north actually is not a destination forthe company, it's a type of company you want to build. Yeah,you know, if you build, if you build a company and you ifyou build a team, you know, even a small team, and youbuild it with the right purpose in mind, it doesn't really matter the roots thatyou take to get where you need to get to. So and thetrue north is about the type of organization that you want to become, becausethen it doesn't matter if you're if you're if you're just going to IPO,for example, as virus it's just put a block on everybody that's rushing toIPO and silicon valley at the moment right there's already the casualties. Any companythat's exposed to the travel market is in trouble, especially if they're if they'refunded, and there are, there are a small startup organization. So we'rereally starting to see some of those get...

...hit by what's going on. Butthe true north of the company is really about what type of organization do wewant to build, what do we want to do, what do we wantto become? And I think in today's environment, with our first day oflocked up, lockdown in the UK, it really shines is to well,we can sit here and try and make money on that, on this becauseautomation is a huge opportunity. When there's not enough people around to do thework and people are working from home, there's huge amounts of opportunity for usto go in and say, look, there's lots of different pots that youcan build to be able to do this work. What we're trying to doat the moment as an example, as we're working closely with the NHS andgovernment, and I'm not going to say anything more at the moment, butwe're trying to build as many bots free of charge. We're not charging forthis, just to try and figure out how quickly we can move information aroundwith regards to covid where the hot spots might lie, because dayten, bigdata coming in is going to be a big, big problem as this startsto scale up. We've seen in Italy. You know, where are the freebids? Everything's done manually. We need some kind of system to beable to identify where we have capacity, where we have hot spots. There'sso many different opportunities for information to fly around and get lost in this crisis. So I think companies, if you have a true north companies, willdo the right thing in times of need rather than just carry on going inthe direction of the game. Now we have to carry on right business becausewe support over fourzero enterprises and we have to figure out for them as well. We've, for example, we've created an HR bought that tracks where yourstaff are and we've told all of our customers just downloaded, there's no costfor this thing. Just download it, find out where I are, makesure a few of my team, for example, and isolation. The kidshave got ill and they fact a lock themselves in. Our HR team needsto know how they are. They reporting every day and we use a botto be able to track all of that. We're trying to push that type oftechnology out into the marketplace and be...

...having your true north allows you tothat flexibility to do the right thing first, rather than just chase the direction youwere going. And if you're just you're true north is just the directionor just an IPO or just we want to be a billion, two,billion, twenty billion dollar company. How you get there will be much morecomplex, whereas if the company's led with a vision of this is where we'regoing to go and along the way we're going to have lots of adventures.It's a very different type of place to work and we can get sixteen hoursout of people with with a lot of enthusiasm because we all believe we're doingthe right thing. Okay, okay, cool, that's that's really interesting andthanks for that. Inside so well. I think we're sort of near intothe end of our conversation today and really appreciate that you've taken the time toshare your thoughts around marketing, your why, how you keep the nesting consistent andand actually how you build a company with a true north mindset. Iguess is is is the key, rather than looking at it as a destination. Now I'm sure there's going to be a lot of people that will wantto continue that conversation with you. So, if that is indeed the case,how would you suggest that people get in touch with both yourself and,of course, your company, automation anywhere? Sure, so, if you wantto get in touch with me, I'm on Linkedin, rock views.I'm automation anywhere. I'm pretty easy to find. My profile is open.Alternatively, you know, we can go to our website. Is Automation anywherecomdo search on Google and will pop up as lots of videos and so on. So anyway. Anybody wants to each other and carry on with the conversationwill happy to do so and once again, thanks very much for inviting me.I really enjoyed a talking with you, Dan, and thank you very much. Thank you once again, and stay safe and look forward to catchup against operatics has redefined the meaning of revenue generation for technology companies worldwide.While the traditional concepts of building and managing inside sales teams inhouse has existed formany years, companies are struggling with a...

...lack of focus, agility and scalerequired in today's fast and complex world of enterprise technology sales. See How operaticscan help your company accelerate pipeline at operatics dotnet. You've been listening to beto be revenue acceleration. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribeto the show in your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening.Until next time,.

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