B2B Revenue Acceleration
B2B Revenue Acceleration

Episode · 1 year ago

79. Marketers, Never Forget Your Why!

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

As marketers, our why should be the foundation of everything we do.

But we all too often lose sight of our why behind promoting our products and services.

In this episode, I interview Rob Hughes, VP and Head of Marketing for EU at Automation Anywhere, about the reasons marketers should hold on to their why more tightly than ever.

What we talked about: Keeping your why at the forefront, using your why to shape messaging for prospects & customers, Vision is more fulfilling than product, Linking your work to societal change will reignite your passion

 

To hear this interview and many more like it, subscribe to The B2B Revenue Acceleration Podcast on Apple Podcasts, on Spotify, or on our website.

You're listening to Beto B revenue,acceleration, a podcast dedicated o helping software executives stay on thecutting edge of sailes and marketing in their industry. Let's get into the show, welcome to vtb revenue acceleration. Myname is Dan Seebrook, and I'm here today with Rock Hughes, VP and headandmarketing for EU automation anywhere morning, rob how you doing todaymorning, then very well, thanks o Fira Day of official lockdown everybodystarting to face up to the challenges of this. NowI'm planning I'm growing a beard and HA's MEBN. It's never been a bittertime, so yeu wee trying our bist, but our first day and everybody's everybodystill voyant, atmoment, Soo, absolutely wel think we're all in the same boattogether I I would say that I would try and grow abid, but I think I'm going to need longer than three weeks so so I don't think I've go done that root,but hopefully we can know with this podcast provice some. You know somesome content and some some easy listening for people to receive whenthey're not head down at work throughout the day. So the topic todayROB is, is around marketing and marketed. Never forget your wife, butbefore we get into that conversation, could you please introduce yourself toour audience and give us a feel for your company and automation, anway sure,so I run marketing for Europe for automation anywhere? I joined thecompany from an analyst background. I was in there analyst community forfifteen years and automation anywhere came around as as all vendors do forfor all amlous houses. Everybody Pictures Your Business and tries togain some insidtis to how to game Pi Competitive Advantage and understandwhat the markets doing and where the opportunities might lie and Urpa camealong as as a sector really, and it was it's one of those technologies that Icouldn't find a business hole intis to why we wouldn't do it or why a companywouldn't start to automateal be force...

...to automate. You know the the macroenvironment is driving us to be much more efficient. I mean this recent issue with the with the virus and so on.It's just emphasized there even further, but you know you have to have some kind of straight throughprocessing goals in place. Otherwise we're not going to get to. We hav beenbe able to deliver the services and the products that customers and partnersand our egosystem is used to delivery with the same amount of people. so as te, the world population begins the peak we're going to end up with a lot moreold people and a lot fewer young people to do the work, and so we'll have morepeople to serve and lest people o do the work. That's one of the the macrodrivers around it, as well as companies like Amazon and new digital nativeorganizations coming and changing the way that businesses are run. So, afterfifteen years of listening to lots of business pictures, I woke up onemorning and said IPA is the it's going to be the future and I've going todecide whether I talk about it or whether I get involved with it, and Igot involved director with automation anywhere so automation anywhere as oneof the leaders in the marketplace and at that time it was still one of theleaders in the marketplace. It seems years ago, but it was only etee and ahalf years ago that I joined and I joined because of the visionof LEnomation anywhere in any new technology organization, that I think theleadership of the leaning companies within those those markets is criticalto define who's going to be the thought leader in the space and th. I joy, OT,emotion anyway, because I believe in the vision of the company has- and Ibelieve in theyre, in the leadership their experience and getting Estecision. So that's a little bit about being a little bit about the companyYeah and I guess markting in a Higros sector like RBA, brings a lot ofdifferent elements to it. There's a lot of different challenges, there's anelement of maybe not creating a category but kind of reinventing yourCAC career around automation and that sort of message: Arand, intelligentautomation, so from wonting to...

Spectruum, I'm fure you've got yourhands ful. Now, Robin A in a recent conversation. You've been telling usthat that you are a strong advocate of the transactional, approch tomarketing.Actually, that's all about making your communications, your campaigns, yourmessaging, ensuring it AVIANC to your companies overall mission and values.Now can you elaborate on that further for our audience and tell us tell us why that and also give us afeel for why a marketers need to really keep their kind of kind of corporateand an individual wire at the at e forefront of their mind? When not sure- and I think you know thetransactional bit th- that you mentioned- there is important as it'sthe transactional components that we build up marketing and by transactionalI mean we do an event. We run AWIY Banou. We run so contents an vacation.We do some blace ads. These are all leavers and they're all transactionalcomponents to get us to where we need to get to. But I see I've got. I comefrom a predominantly a sales background, quite high level. Sales, quite bigdeals, advisory type work rather than product, so you almost having toInvente your own pitch your you know in the information space. It's all aboutthe stories that you tell and that's why marketing sit so comfortably withme, because in that consultancy space you kind of have to create your ownmarketing and your own ideas, because you're selling intellectual property,an reality and you're selling a vision, you're, not selling something hard or apart, or something that sa you can touch and feel and use and Youe sanding.An idea approach, advice et c. That offered me, I suppose, a differentapproach to to the marketing component and saying when I stepped astep backfrom what marketing is traditionally doing,which is supporting sales, and we've heard this terminology, aound marketing,lad organizations and marketing their companies and so on, and but nobody notnobody's the wrong way to put it. But...

...very few companies seem to adopt it andrun thear marketing organization built on inside data. They they based on a lotof transactional data. This event really worked for me: Iran, a women arearound it and we ran a blog at the end of it and we ran a whole lot oftransactional meeting maker type of functions for us. That's those those transectional components add up into aprogram and the program is focused around certain things that might befocusing on your talker account list that might be displacement. It might bea number of different things, but that program will run for most people willcall that a campaign our campaigns actually run annually. So the annualidea is that W and we work in verdical. So we look at very cool markets. Weunderstand those markets, we understand our TARGO accountlass within thosemarkets. We understand how we need to get to them and we spend around sixmonths every year, just gathering data to make sure that we understand we're,aiming our sales team at the the right functions at the right opportunitiesand and people who want to engage with us. The idea of the why and you know,wiretess is important and having an overarchi umbrella around this, allowsus to take areo their transactional components and put them into theprograms that are required and then run those programs in line with thespecific campaigns, but it allows us to align very closely with sales and wedon't marketing doesn't hand over it to sales, and I think that's the same inmost organizations actually and thet. You know, if you think abouthanbarketing influences a specific person. Let's say it's a bye or aninfluence O or it just a user developer. Whatever from the moment, they areexposed to your brand from that very first touchpoint. They could pick up anewspaper and read abargo. They could download a white paper could go ontothe website whatever it might be. The moment hiy touch your brand untilreally that moment, that person disappears out of your ecosystem. It'smarketing responsibility to influence...

...the messaging, make sure that they havethe information that they need. Make sure that ourselves organization is aline to be able to give with them what they need when they need it, and if wetie it into the overall campaign, we understand there wil world a lot betterbecause we're listening to them. The programs are aligned for our businessgoals and the tactics are put together to be able the various tacticalapproaches are put together in line with the overall achievement of wherewe need to get to so sorry for the couldn't vote. The confusitinexplanation, but hopefully that gives you an idea of why we look at the thewhy you have to figure out why we're doing this in the first placeunderstand that we own the customer from beginning to end and every singletime we touch them. We have an opportunity to either influence in oneway or another, either positively onr negativelit and our job is to own thatwhole journey from beginning to end and every consactuonal touch poit that wehave has to be part of a wider story so that they don't feel as if there'smultiple messages coming from all over the place and then also allows us towalk our sales team in and support ourselves in through the whole lifetimeof the customer experience whether that the that onts off purchase or whetherit be you know a twenty year relationship, it's our job to helpsales D and and held customer support and services and everything else thatthe business touches with thoir customer. So when we're talking aboutthe transactional pieces, adding up to the, why that's kind of the approachthat we take? Okay, that's really interesting. Take on sor of building relationshipswith with customers out of interest. Does that approach remain the same bothto new prospect and also existing customers? Or would you would you,based on that sort of process you've just described there, take a differentapproach to Marktinto your disting customer base versus New Prospect Botfor our position purposes. Yeah I mean you prospectsis as always a different.It's a different ecosystem, the problems ow over the problems thatcompany's face always the same. You...

...know a lot of us get hung up on. Howwill we do on the gardener, magic, quadrant or os we've received, or how many timeswe're number one on whatever quadrants and how many times we mentioned, thenthen we tend to go to market and jump up and down and say: Look it on O onodone and we put all tthese post Ar. I think you know quite often companies own wayto focus on what they do. A not enough focus on what the outcome of themarkets that we're serving is and we've got to relate our products and Servicis to solve their problem, not wolking and say: Look We build robots is andtheyre cool. So I think all organizations are struggling withthis idea. Thet probuct the product is going to sell it for you and I see alot of marketing were selling has happening in the marketing process. Now it's really about supplying companieswith the information they need in a professional manner that they trustyour source and say these are. This is a company that I want to come and talkto whether that's a prospect or a customer with a customer. You shouldhave a lot higher level of trust anyway, and the message should still be thesame. It's about solving problems for the customer, it's not about theproduct now the channels that we use and noise will be different dependingon whether it's a prospect or a customer, because you can't swamp yourcustomers with too much marketing information. You have to have a verydifferent type of approach. It maybe ABM one to one Oro theyr depending onthe company, maybe one to onto a few, so we tend not to look at different strategies or different messaging. Themessaging should be the same. He messaging should be a land of acustomer outcome and success. It shouldn't be Aland about our productand I think that that shouldn't differen between customer and Prospict,but we can tell the stories coming from customers. We use a lot of user case studies and so on, andsometimes we have to anonymize them. But it's really about the odd of thepossible because I in our market, as you said, it's a new market, wet kindof. I don't like the idea of creating...

...the market. I think it's a wrong way toput it. It scares me if I'm on a T, but it's much more about adapting to themarket and leaning it from a thought leadership perspective as this, how wetry to to see it with a server n, not the wave. The way was behind us andwe're trying to stay on top of of the way to make sure that we can see what'scoming yeah and I think that's an interesting takeand at regarding yourmarket, I mean, I think, the idea around autonating things an automationin general that a as been around for a long time, but RPA is kind of the next phase of that,and I agree, I'm not sure, you're having to completely create a market. Ithink the market is people believe the markets there, it's kind of aboutreinventing in and bring a new intelligent version of automation tothe forefront, F people o might nol you're talking Oaye on an conversationaround your transition from a from a sales background into more of aconsultancy, Omanalyst area and through director joining automation anywhere inthe marksing team, and I think you spoke about the fact that you joinedhim because it was Caseo F. do you keep talking about it or do you get involvedin it and, I suppose tha reason you go invold in it. You really believed in inthe technology and the impact that you're having on on businesses anonpeople's lives. Now that's an interesting taking andinteresting journey. I'm sure a lot of people can relate to that, but how,from your especting, how important is it for people to join company that theycan personally relate to from from a mission or vision perspective? What doyou think I is possible? Actually that sells, Marktin professional pats, Idon't care, and it's just about. They see a big opportunity to a lot of money, freaedup freak, Onpor d.You think it's really about doing something that you deeply care about. Yeah, that's that's a great questionand, and you know it's weird, as you get olderdifferent things matter to you D, when you're young, you know the M series caris the biggest focuse in your life as a young man, let's say, but as you getolder, you know you start to realize at...

...once. You get stuff, and you know thisis well goes way: Youare, marketing and and Sal. This is how we go alone. Youknow you realize that the more stuff doesn't make you happy and it's thelittle things that you want to work towards, and you know I've been luckyenough to be pretty successful in a lot of companies and with fantastic peoplearound me. The analyst community surrounded me with PhDs and then brainboxes that I'll never ever have that opportunity again. With the you know,professors from Lun School with economics with my colleagues, you knowso your baancing ideas and Boad Processas, often a and then but overtime. You generate a wider understanding of potential in life andwhat your potential might be- and I think is market- is most a lot ofpeople get into marketing because it's seen as creative. But now thatI'Vei've been in the marketing space for a while- and I see the creative bit is actually abit of a dying art and I see everything based on analytics and pulling leversin a digital. Everybody Talks About Digital Being Kei. If your storyis, notgood enough- and you don't believe in it, you don't have the passion for, andyou don't understand the impact that you're trying to have, and you can'trelate your product to that. You really really striggle to have any kind ofreal enthusiasm behind what you do or how you run your teams ar how you doyour job. Now it sounds admirable admirable to say, and very loftyactually to say, only take a job that you really love. You know we see thisall over the place, but I think through time you know you have to do your wartzand all you have to you know: Crak get the calises and do the hard work andlearn through experiences is in my experiences, its bee. The PISS WAY tolearn ban you hiad enough times an you stop doing stupid things, but and it'snever the first time that you stop trustigme t you', always givin anothergo, but I think you know for me. I looked at this automationally I lookeat Ourpa at the market, and you said: Yea we're not creating the market andthe problem with us is we're so successful in this marketplace. We grow,we double our business. O We've been...

...doing it for over ten years now a yearon year, and we do it not. With these we were hard to get there and when youget to a certain size, double it becomes agot issue o real challenge,but with the the goal behind the wiff of belief that we're making the rightimpact the you can change the world and for me it was looking at automationanyway, looking at DBA market and saying, if I look at the macro world, Imean I've already mentioned that we don't have enough people, we losetwenty eight million people out of the workforce in the next for years. Justin Europe, now that's going to be a nearly twelve percent of our workforcesgoing to disappuit, so we have to do more with less being a digital companyif you're, not a digital company. I don't know what business you're in eeverybody's digital and for maybe not their operations, but in they're goingto market everybody has digital offerings where its websites or apps orwhatever it might be everybody's got their foot in the water there. Thechallenge that companies serve is we didn't? The majority of our operationsis not digital. It's based on legacy and RPA can step and modernize all ofthat. But for me, it's much more o out I've seen so many people in my careerrebriliant people that are doing very mandane jobs. People with MAS and NIndian running call, centers or sitting on e the other side of the phone, andthen we wonder why we have higatrition in these an India specifically becausewe have hugely talented people, do very manday jobs, there's outsource Tohias,so my mess fol Liss that can't carry on we've got a free up intellectualcapacity of humans. We've got to change this. This virus is really exposed us.Our supply chains are exposed. There's there's a hotid drug, for example. Inthe US. I think they said seven hundred an ninety tosand people are on thisdrug and it's only manufactured in China. Now that's not pointed fingersat anybody. It saying that there's a weakness, an our supply chain and ifthe supply chains get shut down, forget about the virus, O seven hundred andninety thousand people that are relying on Thatr drug to keep them alive or nowat risk. So the way oe business is ha...

...is going to have to change ther. Thewhole market is the whole world, is pivoting at the moment to try andunderstand how do we stop this type of thing in the future? How do we wil failsafes in, and I think the only way to do that is to free people up toactually be people and think and contribute and just add value ratherthan just do things. So I think over time. For me, they, you know the the golden light was the world is goingto change. The economic models of the world are changing because of the waythat digital companies where people are trying to companies are tryingdifferent things, they're trying things they've. Never done before we've beenpoking at adgile for a long time now we're all working from home. It matterswhatanever how we think how we operate. So I think that, from a missionperspective, you have to believe that you're doing in my in my case, I'mlooking at and thinking this software can actually free people to actuallyhave interesting lives, rather than just do the same thing over and overand over again and repeat it and Etca. We never release the potential ofhumans and we're going to have to as we pove Forwardin we face with thesemassive ecological changes. These massive challenges that we've got withthis virus- and you know we don't know if this is the the last we're going tosee of these types of things. So I think moving forward a company ofpeople, r smart people have to align themselves to good causes. They have tohave a societal impact if they're really going to make a change, becauseyou know tha and lastly, everybody's on their soadbox. So everybody's got acomment about your business. You know how organizations behave is critiqueconstantly and companies can be made or broken. You know if the right people orthe right influence as the same the wrong things about them, so all theright things about them so we're much more into ovand. I think you have to besocially responsible and we have to figure out how your product of servicecan tie into doing something positive...

...rather than just making money. I knowit sounds a bit lofty, but it almost everything in every product in theworld, besides the obvious ones, Kcan have some kind of positive impact onthe the environment that we serve and, as for me, understanding what that isin linking it that that helps me decide where I want to work and where I wantto throw my efforts for sure absolutely and to your point, SOM MOE exampleyou're using around you know today in a virus and how much ap Bringg it to theto reality for lother people that haven't sort of thought about theimpact of. If we hade something like this, how can we very quickly work fromhome? I mean there's a lot of businesses that are benefiting verynicely from the from the current circumstances, based on exactly that:collaboration tools or communication, tods or security providers that an evil,remote work and so to easily. But actually, I think to your point, and itis lofty, but I think situations like we've seen ourselves inrecently absolutely will nean that the sort of general work and pattern andprocess is going to have to change and N to your point, companies likeyourself ar probably well placed to impact that we look at autimationanywhere as a company ore going through hyper growth. As you spoke about thereand as we see with a lot of businesses, they coan begin to lose their way alittle bit as that happens, and and Akeep that consistency when scaling isa challenge. Have you seen that as a challenge, our automation anywhere andfrom what are some of the things that you guys are doing to ensure that alionmend inconsistency around your around your messaging around yourwirely? How do you ensure that that's still there, as you keep growing, Ithink we're sticking to we've got a fairly extensive five year plan andplace- that's not actually coming to the end of its the end of its activation, but you knowwhen you're building a company, that's growing this quicklyin and just to putit in perspective. I was employee two hundred and seventy three and we nowtwo tousand. I think two thousand six...

...hundred employees. The last time Icheck the's, not including the developers and the tempt afti work with us and supportus at Setrat. So and that's happened in three years, just over three years soand Wer now N. I think we're in ninety two countries were active with salesand Wer weare over fifty companies. We have officers now and when I started,we had no officers in Europe at all. We now have three hundred an fiftypeople in Europe and we have officers in London, Paris, Frankfurt Munich atwar saw Milan which is closed of it, lit everywhere's closed at the momentand Midrads Neterlands, and I think I've covered everything in the Europe.I'm not one hundred percent. I think the H O Switzerland. We have anofficers in Switzerland as long to me, so we've grown pretty quickly and- andyou know, I think the challenge on on scaling and consistency is always. Youknow, keep your true north decide what kind of company you want to be in adifferent everybody knows at different growth levels. You require differentsets of skills to get you there. You know as your move as you become moreCorbrat, you need to hire a differency of O. for example, you need to hire adifferent team of people t at that around compliance, Inclu, we'reimplementing huge systems from workday throughto, full implementation for reallimitations of sales force, etc. You need a whole team of skilled internal.It services guys to be able to build it, but the way to keep everybody I suppose kind of ontrack is- is havping your tree north and just reitorating that so we heve asat of values that we live by and we try and will we run by Okrs as well? I don'tknow if you're familiar with their pator objectives and cu redults andthose are all broken down from our CEO Right, the way down to me and my teamand everybody else. We all have a said of okrs and those are really thetransactional stuff that we're trying...

...to achieve an they all kind of tod Lovto make sure that Mero has what he needs when he walks into the boardmeeting an soon. So it's not easy an you have to have a plan B. IM honest.You know, because Plana very seldom works or it never works out. The wayyou wantid to Tsit's always plane version twenty six by the time you getto the end of the journey, if you, if you're still with your PLO Plana we'vebeen lucky and that the marketis very very active, so you know, we've triedthings: We've got huge product development teams. We've been a hugeamount of our revenue. I can't give the exact percentage, but a largepercentage of our lier goes back into rnd for product development, so whereour PA is today is credible. It's almost the AI off three years ago. You know the technology doesn't getdumber and get smaller as it technology get smogty. You need to stack up andextend your product offering into t you know, rather than just task whatomotion Ou Needu full process automation you need to incorporate AIand analytics. We just built a BOT called discovery, but that actually runs across your systems andthen bills a Bot automatically for you. So you don't actually have to have anykind of internal development just play in play kind kind of stuff. So I thinkyou got to keep Tet thrue north in hyperscale. You got to know whereyou're going, no matter which rout you have to take to get there, becausethose change all the time so and under communications super important. It'sthe most important thing, I think in any business cler communication as towhere we need to go and need to spend a lot of time communicating to the teaminternally to make sure that everybody's focused and o hundred percent focused, I suppose,on where you need to get to. Otherwise you are not going to get there. So communication you're true north andthose are probably the two most important points I think in any Scaliorganization. Let's just keep keep your direction and show you flexibility on.You know how you're going to get there...

...and- and you know, if you in anyhyperscale business, people tend to work a lot longer hours just to be ableto there. You Know Ere's a lot of entrepreneurial type, people that YourlPoy, especially in here early days, to get stuff up and running, and some ofthem ere working sixty nine days six days a week for two or three years at atime, and you have to have a bigger purpose. You have to have a better treenorth than just Ohin in IPO. You know very few people are motivated by that. So I think when you're younger ipisvery attractive, but after a while, you realized the complexities around Yeauyour way from as much as you can but yeah i Tati'l. Let me stop there. Ithink tree doors, atflexibility and being and having a decent purpose. Filhelp yet there in hyperscale. Okay, not certain. That's a really interestingespecto, ont and Jus, trying to point around that is you mentioned about having a true north,but in a in a scaling, hypergrowth company. Do you ever see that there's aan opportunity or an instance where actually your your true nauth or yourwire ound? What you're doing can change. Is that something that you could seehappening, or would that mean that you actually perhaps haven'nfound ID trougan north in the first place? That's you're, absolutely right Tan. What Imean by true norts? Actually, it's not a destination for the company, IT'S Atype of company! You want to build yeah, you know if you build, if you build acompany and I if you build a team, you know even a small team and you build itwith the right purpose in mine. It doesn't really matter the roots thatyou take to get we need to get to. So the true hourse is about the type oforganization that you want to become and because then it doesn't matter ifyou', if you're, if You'e just GOINGTO IPO, for example, is virus, is just puta block on everybody. That's rushing to IPO and and Silican Valley of thehoment right, there's alreadly e casualties. Any company that's exposedto the travel marketis is in trouble, especially if theyre, if they fund etind there they're a swol startup...

...organization. So we're really startingto see some of those get hit by what's going on. But the true north of thecompany is really about what type of organization do we want to build? Whatdo we want to do? What to we want to become, and I think in today'senvironment, with the our first day of lockd lock down on the UK, it reallyshines as to well. We can sit here trying to make money on the onthes,because automation is a huge opportunity when there's n enoughpeople around to do the work and people are working from home. There's hugeamounts of opportunity for us to go in and say, look, there's lots ofdifferent pots that you can build to be able to do. This were what we're tryingto do at the moment, as an example is wer working closely with the NGS andgovernment and I'm not going to say anything more at the moment, but we'retrying to build as many touhts free of charge, withot charging for this justto try and figure out how quickly we can move information around withregards to Covid, where the hot spots might lie, because data and big datacoming in is going to be a big big problem as the starts to scale up weeseen in Italy. You know: Where are the free bids everything's done manually?We need some kind of system to be able to identify where we have capacitywhere we have hot spots, there's so many different opportunities forinformation to fly around and get lost in this crisis. So I think companies,if you have a true north companies, will do the right thing in times ofneed, rather than just carry on going in the direction of the Ga. Now we haveto carry on rign business because we spool over four thousand enterprisesand we have to figure out for them as well. We, for example, we've created ajob of thet tracks where your star fare and we've told all of our customerrsjust download at there's no cost of this thing, just download it find outwhere I are make sure a few of my team, for example and isolation. The kidshave got ill and they've had to lock themselves in our ageirt needs to know how they areand they report in every day, and we use a bot to be able to track all ofthat. We're trying to push that type...

...technology aut into the marketplace andbeing having your true north allows you to that flexibility. To do the rightthing. First, rather than just chase the direction you were going in, ifyou're, just your tru north, is just the direction or just an IPO, or justwe want to be a billion two billion twenty billion dollar company. How youget there will be much more complex, whereas if the companies lid with avision of this is where we're going to go and along the way, we're going tohave lots of adventures, it's a very different type of place to work, and wecan get sixteen hours out of people with with a lot of enthusiasm, becausewe all believe we're doing the right thing: okay, okay, cool! That's that'sreally interesting, and thank for that inside so well. I think we're sort ofnear into the end of conversation today and really appreciate that you've takena time to share your thoughts around marking your. Why, how you keep themessging, consistent and and actually how you build a company with a trueNorth Mindset, I guess is- is the key rather than it looking at it as adestination. Now I'm sure there's going to be a lot of people that l want tocontinue that conversation with you. So if that is indeed the case, how wouldyou suggest that people get in touch with both yourself and, of course, youcompany, our automation anyway sure? So, if you want to get in touch with me,I'm onlinked in Rob Hus, I'm a automation anyway, I'm pretty easy tofind my profiles open. Alternatively, you know you can go to our website. IsAutomation, anywaycom A do search on Googe? It will pop up thare's lots ofvideos and so on. So anyway, anybody wants to reach out and carry on with aconversation more than happy to do so and once Ogo thanks very much forinvice me. I really enjoyed e talking with o Dan and thank you very much o goon. Thank you once again and stay safe Andaford to catch up against you. UPER ADICS has redefined the meaning ofrevenue generation for technology companies worldwide, while thetraditional concepts of building and managing insize sales teams in househas existed for many years. Companies...

...are struggling with the lack of focus,agility and scale required in today's fast and complex world of enterprisetechnology sales see Ow operatics can help your company accelerate pipelineat operatics dot net you've been listening to B, to be revenueacceleration to ensure that you never miss an episode subscribe to the showin your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening until nexttime.

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