B2B Revenue Acceleration
B2B Revenue Acceleration

Episode · 1 month ago

116: The Do’s & Don’ts of Video Prospecting w/ Tyler Lessard

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed many of the ways we interact with each other, and business is no exception. With many opting for video calls over in-person meetings, it’s opened the door to the bigger question: How can we use video technology to differentiate ourselves from competitors?

On this episode of B2B Revenue Acceleration, we talk with Tyler Lessard. Tyler is the VP Marketing and Chief Video Strategist at Vidyard, and was kind enough to come on the podcast to discuss all the “Do’s & Don’ts” of Video Prospecting.

This episode includes the following topics: the biggest opportunities with video in sales, how to craft a strong, tailored message to prospects, video prospecting mistakes to be mindful of, the mass adoption of video technology, and its use as a prospecting channel.

To hear this interview and many more like it, subscribe to The B2B Revenue Acceleration Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

You were listening to be to berevenue acceleration, a podcast dedicated to helping software executive stay on the cutting edgeof sales and marketing in their industry. Let's get into the show. Hi, welcome to be to be revenue acceleration. My name is Dancy Brook and I'mhere today with Tyler Lessard, BPM marketing at video. How you doing, tyler? I'm absolutely great. It's a Halloween celebration here day today,so I'm full up in my Ted Lasso costume, so I'm having a heckof a good time today here. Dad, how are you well? I'm notdressed up as a dead last, so I actually I'm the party boopBro. I'm dressed in normal blood but you know, I'm good. It'sa Friday we're talking before this pool you said. I'm busy. Vp ofsuves Q, for is actually the last day of our few three today.It's it's all good. Fortunately, we've done a record quarter, so it'skind of wouldn't say it's feat up the shore, but it's it's a littlebit less pressure than they normally would be on the last day of quarter.Well, it's great to hear congrats on closing out the quarter. congrats onsounds like a record quarter, but we all know, as you know peoplein the sales community, it's only when we're recording. It's October twenty nine. I calculate at least five days left in the quarter. You can gothrough till like October thirty four. So you sat exactly that, exactly that. So to get started with the with the discussion today, the podcast today, be great if you could give a bit of background to our listeners onon yourself, but also your company. I know it's about video prospecting todayand you guys are pretty much deleted in that. So it'd be great ifyou could just give a bit of introduction into that and yeah, my pleasure. So my name is Tyler lasard. I am the VP marketing and chiefvideo strategists here at Vid Yard. VIDE ARD as a business, we providea suite of video technologies to businesses. We have video hosting and management platformfor marketing teams, but in recent years we have seen the growing adoption ofour video messaging tools for sales teams, which is really designed to make iteasy for anyone in sales to be able to record and send personal video messages, screen recording videos right over via email or social channels to their prospects andcustomers as, frankly, just a better way to communicate their messages when wecan't be there in person anymore. So that's been a really exciting area offocus for us and I personally have been spending a lot of time in thesales community understanding how are people using video in different ways, what's really workingfor them to see success and how can we pull the best practices from thatand share them with others? So excited to explore that here today. Allright, absolutely. If you look at Your Business, the lost couple years, to your point, around trying to connect with people by video, becausewe go basically not being an ounce to do that in person. How haveyou have have you seen that impact your business, postively or negatively? I'mI've lost year and a half of set. Yeah, well, it's been reallyinteresting and, to say the least, the last couple of years. Ithink we all know that in the world of sales, like couple bigthings have really happened. Of course, the great virtualization has happened, whichboth means we're more and often than not selling remotely, but also it meansour customers are buying remotely. Less and less they're having people into their offices, if at all. More and more they're buying committees are distributed from eachother. They're no longer all getting into the same meeting room together for,you know, a live or even video call with with you as a salesrep so there are a lot of changing dynamics that are happening purely because ofthis sort of surge in virtual selling and buying. Obviously, as part ofthat, video has become a huge thing. A lot of us are doing,if not all of us are doing, zoom calls, Google meets webex is, whatever it happens to be, and that has started to at leastnormalize the use of cameras and microphones in our lives as salespeople and business professionals. So we kind of have this new baseline we're working with where we're allat least comfortable now getting on camera communicating over video. But that's now alsoopen this door for people to be able to do more with video than justlive calls. The live video call is a great replacement for the in personmeeting or the phone call. But what...

...about all those emails we send?You know? What about all those slack messages we send? Well, avideo message can actually be a great video alternative to those as well. Sothat's starting to happen as sales reps are getting comfortable at least with video andcamera and starting to find these tools to go hey, I can record andsend a short video to prospect somebody to introduce myself or to walk through aelse proposal to help close a deal faster. So it's all these interesting sort ofburgeoning use cases of video that we started to see, which has been, you know, great for our own sales team and, of course,great for all the companies that we work with. So to your point,there a sounds if you're seeing, you know, and an up and orat least their wider adoption of video technologies in different part of the s wouldfund of my perception for from an outsider looking in on the company like yourselves, and just you know, teams did a generally, you adopting video aspart of their their outreach of that KDEN. So that day today, work andpractice is that it feels to me, and I might have their wrong perceptionhere, but it feels to me that the generally speaking, video oradoption of video messaging as a prospecting channel within says, say with development environment, seems to be perhaps still a relatively low adoption with that. Do youget to feel that's a fair assessment? Absolutely. Yeah, we're still inthe very early days of this. You know, within within our community,of course we live it, we see it every day. We work withliterally thousands of different businesses who are now using video messaging in their prospecting.But when you look at it on mass it is still very, very earlyand most of us, frankly, aren't even getting any video messages to ourwork in boxes from colleagues or from salespeople or otherwise. And so it's stillis very, very early there and actually lies one of the opportunities for alot of sales reps today, those strs and and account executives who are sendingtheir prospects video messages are finding in most cases that it really stands out fromeverything else, partly because it is different and new. I hear all thetime rep sporting me email saying, you know from a prospect saying wow,this was such a great and refreshing way to reach out to me. I'venever gotten a video from a salesperson. I'm intrigued. Let's talk. Sothere is a little bit of power in that right now in that it isdifferent, it's unique. We certainly have seen this rapidly growing use. Sowe do expect it to become, you know, normalized over the next coupleof years, but it is still very much early days and we're also learningabout what's working. Yeah, and and and on that know them. Whenyou look at what's working for the stols that are already using it, thissay roll and then trying to try to teach and in till Lamsday, thebest jaws, the value of of using video as a prospective tactic. ForUst y'alls that have garn using video messaging, video outreach as affected today, whatwould you say if some of the best practices to get the most outof the the solution that they using? Yeah, there's been a number ofthings that we've all learned over the last little while, particularly, as yousaid, when using it for prospecting. So when you think about the roleof a video message when you're prospecting, there's a few things that it cando really, really well and and the most successful SDRs are the ones thatrecognize that and lean into those things. How is video different from when I'mtyping an email or leaving a voice mail, right, like, what's unique aboutvideo and how can I really lean into that? The first thing youis that video can be is a very visual medium, obviously, and itallows us to show rather than just tell. It also allows us to, ofcourse, put ourselves out there on camera and allow the person on theother side to see us, to get to know US and hopefully get totrust us. And so, you know, creating videos that bring your story tolife that of course, have you on camera, but with tools likea videyard and others, you can also record, for example, of yourwhat's up on your screen or your web browser, along with your camera on, and some of the most successful reps are using that as a way toget people's attention. So, for example, if I were prospecting you, Dan, I might, as a very simple little tactic, bring up yourlinkedin profile up on my browser and then I hit the record button with mycamera on right beside it, and I'd...

...start by waving and I'd say hey, Dan, you know I was checking out your business and your profile hereon Linkedin and I noticed that you're the VP of sales. I'd highlight yourlittle vp of sales title and I might say and then I would tie itinto my message. You know the reason I'm reaching out and is I'm actuallyworking with a few other VP's of sales right now. We're all having thesame problem, really low response rates by their SDRs, if that's a problemyou're facing, and then I you know, sort of you know, quickly nailmy message. Yeah, and what I've done there is when I sendthat video over and it lands in your inbox, you open that email upand there's this thumbnail image of the video and you see not only me asthe seller, but you see your own linkedin profile up on the screen andyou immediately know, in a fraction of a second that number one, Ireally did make a video just for you, because that's your linkedin profile. Thiscan't be a copy. YEA, it creates a level of interesting curiositybecause like, Hey, that's me right there. Even that creates something interestingand it just increases your expectation of value, knowing that I've obviously delivered a verypersonal message to you. So there's little things like that of using visualsto get using your personality and practice practice, or you get more and more comfortablein your delivery of your messages. Well, that's a very good pointas well around the practice, practice piece, because some of our recrs internally atoyed around with it at times and I think actually we're on the cuspof getting success, we're on the cusp of turning this into part of awide occaydance and probably stopped. It's all. It's almost like that. I don'tknow if you've seen that image where there's the person that's bashing your rocktrying to get through, and success is just the other side of the wherethey've got through and they're bashing the tipping where in its rock and it's Imean it's a kind of equivalent of that, where they they use it for awhile and just as they're getting about to get success, I stopped andI think it's because in the early days, when you're when you're toying around withit, when you're pressing, it takes time right. It's got totake probably a few minutes to get it right and you're probably paranoid about havingit perfect. And I always say you know, it's not about being perfect, right, it's about doing a good enough job to get it out there. You're going to stand out anyway, to your point, because other thdon't that. So just do a decent job, do a decent message andget it out there and start trying to get feedback. You've got to doit multiple times to start rest even feedback and getting success. Yeah, yeah, you're absolutely right. And you know, one of the the sayings I liketo to share with people to jot down on a little sticky note,you know, so they remember it, is it's about connection, not perfection, and it's as simple as that when you're sending videos, because then thereason you're putting yourself out there on a video the power, and that isthe ability to have that person on the other end actually connect with you asa real human who's invested in helping them solve a problem, which email andvoicemail and everything else it's so hard to do right. No matter how wellyou craft your email message, that person is still just reading it, they'reskimming it, they can't hear your voice, your intonation, they don't feel connectedto you at all, no matter you know how great that message is, but when they can see you and hear you as a real person,it levels that up. So even if you don't nail the perfect message,even if you don't have the best thing up on your screen, just youdelivering it authentically in a way that gives them a sense of trust and asense of potential value, you can create that connection. And to your point, they're not always going to respond to every video you send, but thedata shows that sequences with video messages in them and perform sequences without, andI believe there's a big part to that, of you become more memorable to them, you become somebody that is more than just a name, you becomea face and a real person and eventually, when they do pick up that phoneor they do get that video, they're more likely to engage in aconversation. Very interesting and in terms of if you look at your point aroundit's about connection to affection. That said, I can only imagine right that ifyou've got an FTR that has a lot of template to the emails,is kind of a cadence. It's in outreach, ready to go. That'squicker, right, and sometimes, as Y'all think activity, they think volume, they think speed. So that's quicker than crafting this message. It mighttake you five or ten minutes, whatever it takes together. So, fromyour perspective, when it comes to crofting...

...a really tailored, solid message,is that better reserve for, say, you know, the C level,Bep, director level, individual Robin, say, a practitioner or a userof a solution that you might actually be up front to target? Well,I think a lot of it comes down to, like with many things,how heavily you personalize or customized. You know, really is the you know, the the potential value of that lead or that prospect. I typically wouldn'tnarrow it down to US type of persona. I would narrow it down to thebusiness that I'm selling to. So if I am going after a leadthat is either in a company that is like right at the pinnacle of ourideal customer profile and, you know, I know that they would be aperfect fit for my solution, that's when I'm going to put in a littlebit more time because if I can get their attention, if I'm into aconversation, those are going to convert higher. Or if it's an individual lead thathas been passed to me because we've seen a lot of activity, theyseem highly engaged. Again, they're more likely to convert. I'm going toput in that little extra effort because I know if I can get them intoa conversation they're going to convert at a higher level. So absolutely, thosehigher priority leads are where we see a lot of sales reps leaning into makingand sending a video. But what we do also find is that a lotof reps will also make what we'd call kind of a prerecorded or off theshelf videos, where they don't have to personalize it every time. And,for example, in an outreach sequence there may be a step three that says, okay, here's an email, here's a template and here is, youknow, insert your video here, and it could be one that you've alreadyrecorded. So it could be instead of me saying Hey dan at a DUP, it's me as an individual and I'm just saying hey, it's tyler atvideyard here really, you know, thanks so much for clicking play. Thereason I'm reaching out is I work with a lot of demand gen managers,just like you Blah Blah about. So any time it's a demand gen manager, I just drop that video in and it's not going to work quite aswell as a fully personalized one, but it's efficient and it may have abigger impact than just the templated email message, but it's something that you can doand you can use it over and over again. So a couple differentways you can think about using video, both hyper personalized, custom recorded aswell as when you have off the shelf that you can drop into an emailanytime and send out. Yeah, interesting. Now shifting get a bit when spokenabout a lot of the good that. I'm also interested to hear about thebattle, but maybe I'm most a good right when it tends to practicewhen it comes to video prospects. Now I've been seeing a lot of usrecently on Linkedin and other other places about age and SG as and just sobeople in general, using tactics like the facetime cold facetime as a video prospectingwhich I find just bizarre right, where as a caught of a sequence thatjust randomly face timing and prospects, which you know, I'm sure, isshocking enough to potentially elicit a pick up at some point in time. Butthat's got to be considered poor practice. I would have thought in most circlesright in terms of, if you would to maybe describe not quite such badtactics in that but in end of the notts of good uses or video orthe things to maybe avoid when it comes to video prospecting. Yeah, whatif some of your filters are on that? Yeah, so there's there's a couplethings when you're sending these videos. Yeah, that you absolutely need tobe mindful of. One of the biggest mistakes sellers make is their videos aretoo long and you know they hit the record button and they want to gettheir entire message in there. They want to introduce themselves, they want tointroduce their value proposition, they want to tell a customer story, they wantto show the product up on the screen and ends up being two or threeminutes long and for somebody who is not yet engaged in a conversation, theyare not going to watch that long, no matter how great you are oncamera. So our guidance is when you're using it for cold prospecting, aimfor thirty to sixty seconds for these videos. It's enough time for you to getin there, introduce yourself, tease them a little bit with what you'retrying to deliver, but then pop that out, because if somebody clicks onin the see that it's three minutes, they're not even going to watch.They're going to say enough time for this, so keep it short. There yougo the kiss acron and I like...

...to say they're keep a short seller. Is a good first thing. The second is, as we talked aboutearlier, that sellers give up too early because they find that recording videos areyou know, there's more that goes into it. Right like, as yousaid, it's if I'm not like feeling like I'm looking good that day,I may not want to make them. You know, I stumble over mywords and it takes me ten minutes just to make one one minute video,which is very frustrating. But I think we have to reflect back on whenwe learn new techniques like this. It never pops right away. I mean, think about when you started cold calling, right like, how bad your initialcold calls were absolute and you know how long it's for you to getinto that rhythm where it felt comfortable and you're like, okay, I gotthis, I've mastered in right so videos the same and again a lot ofpeople will be inclined to try it. You know, they'll send ten tofifteen videos and then they'll give up on it because they haven't gotten their responsesand or feels and efficient. And what I've heard from a lot of ourcustomers is that sending around a hundred videos is kind of that threshold where peoplefeel like, okay, I can just do this in my sleep. Now, I can hit the record button, I can nail my message and sendit off. And a hundred videos may sound like a lot to people likewhoa like that's going to take me a long time. But if you justdo five videos a day, right, for a month, you're there.Yeah, or three videos a day for two months, right. And sojust getting those reps in, because I promise you it's going to be askill that you're going to leverage for the rest of your sales career. Right, this isn't just a one time thing. So you can get good at itnow. A promise you. It's going to be a benefit to you, launcher. Yeah, and to your point, you know, getting comfortableand on camera as well, is just for those short snippets, is invaluable, particularly in the world we're now living him right, where it's shifting fromso much in person so much virtual. And if you can get comfortable oncamera and for thirty sixty seconds and that suddenly evolved into thirty minute meeting sixtyminute meetings. It's a really important skill and actually just generally knowing how tocarry yourself on camera is something that's that's overlooked as well. You know SDRsin the past. I remember when I started doing the job I was told, look, it doesn't matter if you if you if you mess up yourcall, the person can't see you. Just a repoints on the other endof the call or whatever. But actually, in turning today's selling environment, that'snot the best advice because yes, in an str you know if you'remaking a call, but at some point in time you're going to have toget comfortable with seeing people and talking to people face to face and that thatthat short video pitched by cameras is a stepping stone to the longer conversations you'llhave with prospects down the line. On that note, actually, so whenit comes we've spoken a lot about the SDR community and yes, you knowthe sgr role using video as a prospect and tactic. I just want togo back to a point you made earlier where you were talking about a's havingthe ability to potentially increase second version rate to deal by by using camera.You you you spoken about one example, which was, you know, maybetalking through a proposal, for example, by by video. Can you maybeexpand a little bit? On your way? You're seeing a huge video as amedium most often. Yeah, I think this is the the biggest opportunity, frankly, in sales right now and the most under utilized area for video. If you think about it from this perspective. You know, any timeas a salesperson, you're going to try to communicate a message, you know, answer a question, explain something, walk through something with a prospect,you can right now. Your arsenal is usually well, I could type onan email and send it to them to answer that question, explain that idea. I could try to book a live video call and we could talk throughit, you know, live, or I might send them an off theshelf piece of content for them to you know, again show them something orexplain it. Those are typically the ways we would handle that today. Youknow, just sending an email, you know, it lacks that personality,that facetime. Those sorts of things trying to schedule a live video call isgreat, but often that's like the last thing your customer wants to do.Or you have a schedule for two weeks out and sending it off the shelfpiece of content could be a nice way...

...to explain something, but it doesn'tgive you the ability to customize it for them or contextualize the message. Yeah, and so recording of video and sending it over is actually this really neatsweet spot right in the middle. Because if, again, if a customerasked, you know, how does this work? Right, instead of saying, oh well, let's book a meeting and I'll walk you through it,why don't I just record a video, bring up my screen, if I'ma software product or something like that, and I'll I'll walk you through itlike I'll record a video, I'll explain it and I'll send it over.You can watch it on your own time, whenever you have a chance, andthat video could be forwarded around to anybody else in the decisionmaking committee whoneeds to see it. And now all of a sudden you're videos getting watchedby five or six people at that account. They've all suddenly now met you rightwithout you ever getting on a call with them, you're becoming more memorable, you're becoming more human with them, and it's a really simple thing thatyou can do. So it's everything from you know. Again, they askyou a question, instead of typing out an email, hit the record buttonand say well, great question, you know. So I wanted to explainit personally, to give you some of the nuances. So the answer isDat it, at it up. But you want to consider this as well. Right and again, getting them to click and watch your video. Now, not only do they get the information, but they're literally spending time with you. Right, you're again, you're becoming more familiar, you're becoming morepersonal, and that also signals to them it better experience with you than theother sales rap who's just sending them links off to stuff. So there's allthese cases where you almost have to pause and think, well, I wantto send them this information, answer this question, explain this idea. Wouldit makes sense for me to hit the record button and make a quick videoto do it? And it's as simple as that and ends up opening upso many areas where you can make a video and use it in your process. Yeah, interesting, this might be a bit of a direct to one. But do you have any stats that you as a company getting a bitmore specific about video? Yeah, that use as a company, have beenable to capture or produce the suggest, you know, x amount of scentage, increasing time to win right, based on needing videos out of your soprocess rather than not. Yeah, it's it's interesting. We we don't havethat primary data ourselves because, you know, we we know how many times videosare getting watched, but it's hard to then extract that further out.But that said, there was a research report done this year called the stateof virtual selling, two thousand and twenty one, which surveyed, it wasnearly a thousand different sales reps, you know, and how they were usingvideo and from those who were using these types of video messages in their salesprocess, it was I think seventy three percent reported higher response rates with video. So that's kind of the prospecting side. But what the interesting thing was aboutfifty percent reported both shorter deal cycles and higher close rates. And shorterdeal cycles. Again, it's interesting to think, well, how would justsending videos do that? But back to this point of instead of scheduling ameeting two weeks out to do a demo? What if I recorded a video andsend it to them right now? Maybe that next meeting becomes a pricingdiscussion instead of a walkthrough. How can it increase close rates? Well,yeah, simple things like giving them a better experience during the process and standingup from your competitors, right through to sending over a proposal where you actuallyhave a video of you walking through it, explaining it clearly to them so theyknow exactly what they're getting. So yeah, it's interesting to see peoplereporting those different areas by, you know, in pretty needs another process. It'sdefinitely happening, absolutely and I think that's only going to continue evolving.To the earlier points that we are making around adoption still being relatively low despitevideo being such an important medium. Rule of US in today's selling environment.As a I think we when we think video, we think zoom, wethink teams, we think Google. Have we don't think you know, shortsnippets where you can you can really add value in the sale process in betweenlive virtual meetings. We've spoken all about selling and sales people. There's morethan just sales departments. Of course, within businesses, marketing and customer successor other areas that I was I was thinking, as we've been able todone through this this this conversation, that are also areas that could potentially getinvolved in really utilize video as a medium of communication. What are your whatare your thoughts on on other departments using...

...using videos as a means? Yeah, I think it's a very similar discussion. You know, customer success, AccountManagement, it's the same idea. You know, a big part ofyour role is to maintain strong relationships with your customers, to keep yourself topof mind so when the renewal time comes up they're not like, oh,wait a minute, who are you again? So when you are communicating out toyour existing customers as an account manager again periodically, make sure you're sendingthem short video messages, because it gives them an opportunity to see you,for you to continue to be familiar and stay very personal with them. AreReally simple thing you can do. And, of course, yeah, marketing otherareas of the business. You know, the use of video is growing.I think the biggest thing for marketing right now is using video as away to educate audiences. It's less of about you know, it's a greatadvertising and Promo medium. But the best use for video right now, especiallyin D tob is to educate our customers, to show them clearly how something works, to clearly explain different ideas, because they want more and more towhat to consume on their own time and more and more have a perspensity forvisual information. So if we can answer their questions through video, whether it'sstuff we preproduce or stuff we self record and send over as a video message, I think we're all going to be better communicators and will help our customersbe more successful in the wan term. Yeah, and it's a really interestingpoint actually, that around marketing. So there's a couple of things. Firstthing is me and others have had more and more from prospects. You know, can you send us a two minute video or one minute video outlining acompany right which is like at the High Level Company Promo? But then theother thing that I've been hearing a lot of some of our clients, sothey're getting a lot of success with it, is that doing recorded testimony was fortheir clients. Absolutely the recorded testimony was where they're getting success is they'reactually asking our climes to make it super informal. Can you just get likean iphone Selfie, or can you do it like it? To your point, like a video video, as rolling there being is really scripted professional video. There's been an ounce customers that doesn't really feel that authentic. Just dothem, do to do a Selffie or do a bit, do a video, right, it sho super short, super informal. You know, justshoot from their hip and explain what you're actually really thinking about. You knowyour work with that particular vendor, and it makes it much more relatable,right, and I think that's so. That's on the marketing side, inour view. On the customer success side, we as a business, for example, it just really starting to invest now a lot in the customer successand and there's a lot of thoughts around how can we have we develop acustomer success cadence. Now, you know, we've got a lot of people thatare constantly involve with our customers. So is an email every quarter tothe best option? Probably not. What's that? That looks like you're justchecking in and it's not really any value. You know, is sending them anewsletter about your company? Good, it's okay, right. It's keepingthem abreast of your company. It's okay. Is sending them industry content? Youknow? Good, yeah, it's okay, but if you could wrapthat all up into a video and have a kind of regular caiden for keepingthem up today and educated. To your point, just having that person frontof mine, visual and feeling like they're talking to you makes it much morerelevant and engage in than just receiving a newsletter that most of the time peopleculdick come subscribe right sope if yeah, it really does. Yeah, nowI think you're I think you're spot on with all of that. And youknow what I see a lot of people doing with with with things like that, is you have that the newsletter will have some updates, but it willoften have a video as the hero and it might be, you know,an update from the CEO, it might be from the Vpcales, might befrom the head of customer success or it might be from Sarah, the developerwho built a really cool feature that we wanted to tell you about, youknow, getting on a screen share and actually showing I'm really proud of thisnew feature that we built for you. I'm actually the one who built it. I want to show it to you and how it works right. Littlethings like that create this like these moments of these micro moments of connection withour audiences and ways that just we haven't really thought about traditionally. And soeven those little things of like yeah, a video like that going one toomany and then the account manager following up with their own quick little personal videoto their to their customer, you know, saying, Hey, hope you sawlast week's newsletter, really cool updates...

...from it. Just checking in,wanting to make sure everything was good. Let me know if you have anychallenges this week, I can up solve for you. Right, just thosemoments again just create a better affinity for your brand. And we haven't donethem traditionally because, well, it was difficult, it was expensive, likeproducing videos, uploading them, all of that. But that's all gone.Right, we can do this stuff, honestly, as quickly and easily aswe can writing out text based content or making a slide. We just gotto figure it out. Yeah, absolutely. Well, I have to say it'ssomething that we double within our business. But you know, I'm sure us, and now those listening to this will starts to think about a lotmore seriously moving forward because, to be honest, it's it's definitely should haveopened up my mind to thinking about different ways in which all team, andnot just test, you are right, all across a business can actually likevideo in it to make communication and engagement with clients and prospects more relevant andmore engaging. So it's that that's really insightful. So I'm conscious of thetime. We've been speaking for a little while now and and I think we'recoming towards the end of all the amount of time that we meant to bediscussing video prospecting for. So if anyonee to continue the conversation with you specifically, or indeed actually you video, for example, in get in touch aboutthat. How would you suggest that people get in touch with you to continuethe conversation? Yeah, thank you. Yeah, two things. One is, please follow me and connect with me on Linkedin. So Tyler lassard atvideyard. You'll find me there. I share lots of tips examples of usingvideo and sales as well as more probably than that, to check me outthere. And then secondly, yeah, videyard is a free tool that anybodycan use to record and send video messages as part of prospecting. You know, internally you want to send a colleague a quick video or do a screenshare. So you sign up for free. Just go to videyardcom and sign upfor free and start trying it out and see how it works and letme know on Linkedin what you think sounds good. Well, it's been abeen a great conversation. It's been great to me. I really appreciate it. So I'm and I'm sure plenty of people would be getting in touch withyou. I know, I know. I think I still need to connectwith you myself on Linkedin is. I'm going to do that straight away.And Yeah, thanks again and look forward to catching up against wonderful my playerswere. Thanks for having me. Thank you. You've been listening. Tobe to be revenue acceleration. To ensure that you never miss an episode,subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much forlistening. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (119)