B2B Revenue Acceleration
B2B Revenue Acceleration

Episode · 6 months ago

116: The Do’s & Don’ts of Video Prospecting w/ Tyler Lessard

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed many of the ways we interact with each other, and business is no exception. With many opting for video calls over in-person meetings, it’s opened the door to the bigger question: How can we use video technology to differentiate ourselves from competitors?

On this episode of B2B Revenue Acceleration, we talk with Tyler Lessard. Tyler is the VP Marketing and Chief Video Strategist at Vidyard, and was kind enough to come on the podcast to discuss all the “Do’s & Don’ts” of Video Prospecting.

This episode includes the following topics: the biggest opportunities with video in sales, how to craft a strong, tailored message to prospects, video prospecting mistakes to be mindful of, the mass adoption of video technology, and its use as a prospecting channel.

To hear this interview and many more like it, subscribe to The B2B Revenue Acceleration Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

You were listening to be to be revenue acceleration, a podcast dedicated to helping software executive stay on the cutting edge of sales and marketing in their industry. Let's get into the show. Hi, welcome to be to be revenue acceleration. My name is Dancy Brook and I'm here today with Tyler Lessard, BPM marketing at video. How you doing, tyler? I'm absolutely great. It's a Halloween celebration here day today, so I'm full up in my Ted Lasso costume, so I'm having a heck of a good time today here. Dad, how are you well? I'm not dressed up as a dead last, so I actually I'm the party boop Bro. I'm dressed in normal blood but you know, I'm good. It's a Friday we're talking before this pool you said. I'm busy. Vp of suves Q, for is actually the last day of our few three today. It's it's all good. Fortunately, we've done a record quarter, so it's kind of wouldn't say it's feat up the shore, but it's it's a little bit less pressure than they normally would be on the last day of quarter. Well, it's great to hear congrats on closing out the quarter. congrats on sounds like a record quarter, but we all know, as you know people in the sales community, it's only when we're recording. It's October twenty nine. I calculate at least five days left in the quarter. You can go through till like October thirty four. So you sat exactly that, exactly that. So to get started with the with the discussion today, the podcast today, be great if you could give a bit of background to our listeners on on yourself, but also your company. I know it's about video prospecting today and you guys are pretty much deleted in that. So it'd be great if you could just give a bit of introduction into that and yeah, my pleasure. So my name is Tyler lasard. I am the VP marketing and chief video strategists here at Vid Yard. VIDE ARD as a business, we provide a suite of video technologies to businesses. We have video hosting and management platform for marketing teams, but in recent years we have seen the growing adoption of our video messaging tools for sales teams, which is really designed to make it easy for anyone in sales to be able to record and send personal video messages, screen recording videos right over via email or social channels to their prospects and customers as, frankly, just a better way to communicate their messages when we can't be there in person anymore. So that's been a really exciting area of focus for us and I personally have been spending a lot of time in the sales community understanding how are people using video in different ways, what's really working for them to see success and how can we pull the best practices from that and share them with others? So excited to explore that here today. All right, absolutely. If you look at Your Business, the lost couple years, to your point, around trying to connect with people by video, because we go basically not being an ounce to do that in person. How have you have have you seen that impact your business, postively or negatively? I'm I've lost year and a half of set. Yeah, well, it's been really interesting and, to say the least, the last couple of years. I think we all know that in the world of sales, like couple big things have really happened. Of course, the great virtualization has happened, which both means we're more and often than not selling remotely, but also it means our customers are buying remotely. Less and less they're having people into their offices, if at all. More and more they're buying committees are distributed from each other. They're no longer all getting into the same meeting room together for, you know, a live or even video call with with you as a sales rep so there are a lot of changing dynamics that are happening purely because of this sort of surge in virtual selling and buying. Obviously, as part of that, video has become a huge thing. A lot of us are doing, if not all of us are doing, zoom calls, Google meets webex is, whatever it happens to be, and that has started to at least normalize the use of cameras and microphones in our lives as salespeople and business professionals. So we kind of have this new baseline we're working with where we're all at least comfortable now getting on camera communicating over video. But that's now also open this door for people to be able to do more with video than just live calls. The live video call is a great replacement for the in person meeting or the phone call. But what...

...about all those emails we send? You know? What about all those slack messages we send? Well, a video message can actually be a great video alternative to those as well. So that's starting to happen as sales reps are getting comfortable at least with video and camera and starting to find these tools to go hey, I can record and send a short video to prospect somebody to introduce myself or to walk through a else proposal to help close a deal faster. So it's all these interesting sort of burgeoning use cases of video that we started to see, which has been, you know, great for our own sales team and, of course, great for all the companies that we work with. So to your point, there a sounds if you're seeing, you know, and an up and or at least their wider adoption of video technologies in different part of the s would fund of my perception for from an outsider looking in on the company like yourselves, and just you know, teams did a generally, you adopting video as part of their their outreach of that KDEN. So that day today, work and practice is that it feels to me, and I might have their wrong perception here, but it feels to me that the generally speaking, video or adoption of video messaging as a prospecting channel within says, say with development environment, seems to be perhaps still a relatively low adoption with that. Do you get to feel that's a fair assessment? Absolutely. Yeah, we're still in the very early days of this. You know, within within our community, of course we live it, we see it every day. We work with literally thousands of different businesses who are now using video messaging in their prospecting. But when you look at it on mass it is still very, very early and most of us, frankly, aren't even getting any video messages to our work in boxes from colleagues or from salespeople or otherwise. And so it's still is very, very early there and actually lies one of the opportunities for a lot of sales reps today, those strs and and account executives who are sending their prospects video messages are finding in most cases that it really stands out from everything else, partly because it is different and new. I hear all the time rep sporting me email saying, you know from a prospect saying wow, this was such a great and refreshing way to reach out to me. I've never gotten a video from a salesperson. I'm intrigued. Let's talk. So there is a little bit of power in that right now in that it is different, it's unique. We certainly have seen this rapidly growing use. So we do expect it to become, you know, normalized over the next couple of years, but it is still very much early days and we're also learning about what's working. Yeah, and and and on that know them. When you look at what's working for the stols that are already using it, this say roll and then trying to try to teach and in till Lamsday, the best jaws, the value of of using video as a prospective tactic. For Ust y'alls that have garn using video messaging, video outreach as affected today, what would you say if some of the best practices to get the most out of the the solution that they using? Yeah, there's been a number of things that we've all learned over the last little while, particularly, as you said, when using it for prospecting. So when you think about the role of a video message when you're prospecting, there's a few things that it can do really, really well and and the most successful SDRs are the ones that recognize that and lean into those things. How is video different from when I'm typing an email or leaving a voice mail, right, like, what's unique about video and how can I really lean into that? The first thing you is that video can be is a very visual medium, obviously, and it allows us to show rather than just tell. It also allows us to, of course, put ourselves out there on camera and allow the person on the other side to see us, to get to know US and hopefully get to trust us. And so, you know, creating videos that bring your story to life that of course, have you on camera, but with tools like a videyard and others, you can also record, for example, of your what's up on your screen or your web browser, along with your camera on, and some of the most successful reps are using that as a way to get people's attention. So, for example, if I were prospecting you, Dan, I might, as a very simple little tactic, bring up your linkedin profile up on my browser and then I hit the record button with my camera on right beside it, and I'd...

...start by waving and I'd say hey, Dan, you know I was checking out your business and your profile here on Linkedin and I noticed that you're the VP of sales. I'd highlight your little vp of sales title and I might say and then I would tie it into my message. You know the reason I'm reaching out and is I'm actually working with a few other VP's of sales right now. We're all having the same problem, really low response rates by their SDRs, if that's a problem you're facing, and then I you know, sort of you know, quickly nail my message. Yeah, and what I've done there is when I send that video over and it lands in your inbox, you open that email up and there's this thumbnail image of the video and you see not only me as the seller, but you see your own linkedin profile up on the screen and you immediately know, in a fraction of a second that number one, I really did make a video just for you, because that's your linkedin profile. This can't be a copy. YEA, it creates a level of interesting curiosity because like, Hey, that's me right there. Even that creates something interesting and it just increases your expectation of value, knowing that I've obviously delivered a very personal message to you. So there's little things like that of using visuals to get using your personality and practice practice, or you get more and more comfortable in your delivery of your messages. Well, that's a very good point as well around the practice, practice piece, because some of our recrs internally a toyed around with it at times and I think actually we're on the cusp of getting success, we're on the cusp of turning this into part of a wide occaydance and probably stopped. It's all. It's almost like that. I don't know if you've seen that image where there's the person that's bashing your rock trying to get through, and success is just the other side of the where they've got through and they're bashing the tipping where in its rock and it's I mean it's a kind of equivalent of that, where they they use it for a while and just as they're getting about to get success, I stopped and I think it's because in the early days, when you're when you're toying around with it, when you're pressing, it takes time right. It's got to take probably a few minutes to get it right and you're probably paranoid about having it perfect. And I always say you know, it's not about being perfect, right, it's about doing a good enough job to get it out there. You're going to stand out anyway, to your point, because other th don't that. So just do a decent job, do a decent message and get it out there and start trying to get feedback. You've got to do it multiple times to start rest even feedback and getting success. Yeah, yeah, you're absolutely right. And you know, one of the the sayings I like to to share with people to jot down on a little sticky note, you know, so they remember it, is it's about connection, not perfection, and it's as simple as that when you're sending videos, because then the reason you're putting yourself out there on a video the power, and that is the ability to have that person on the other end actually connect with you as a real human who's invested in helping them solve a problem, which email and voicemail and everything else it's so hard to do right. No matter how well you craft your email message, that person is still just reading it, they're skimming it, they can't hear your voice, your intonation, they don't feel connected to you at all, no matter you know how great that message is, but when they can see you and hear you as a real person, it levels that up. So even if you don't nail the perfect message, even if you don't have the best thing up on your screen, just you delivering it authentically in a way that gives them a sense of trust and a sense of potential value, you can create that connection. And to your point, they're not always going to respond to every video you send, but the data shows that sequences with video messages in them and perform sequences without, and I believe there's a big part to that, of you become more memorable to them, you become somebody that is more than just a name, you become a face and a real person and eventually, when they do pick up that phone or they do get that video, they're more likely to engage in a conversation. Very interesting and in terms of if you look at your point around it's about connection to affection. That said, I can only imagine right that if you've got an FTR that has a lot of template to the emails, is kind of a cadence. It's in outreach, ready to go. That's quicker, right, and sometimes, as Y'all think activity, they think volume, they think speed. So that's quicker than crafting this message. It might take you five or ten minutes, whatever it takes together. So, from your perspective, when it comes to crofting...

...a really tailored, solid message, is that better reserve for, say, you know, the C level, Bep, director level, individual Robin, say, a practitioner or a user of a solution that you might actually be up front to target? Well, I think a lot of it comes down to, like with many things, how heavily you personalize or customized. You know, really is the you know, the the potential value of that lead or that prospect. I typically wouldn't narrow it down to US type of persona. I would narrow it down to the business that I'm selling to. So if I am going after a lead that is either in a company that is like right at the pinnacle of our ideal customer profile and, you know, I know that they would be a perfect fit for my solution, that's when I'm going to put in a little bit more time because if I can get their attention, if I'm into a conversation, those are going to convert higher. Or if it's an individual lead that has been passed to me because we've seen a lot of activity, they seem highly engaged. Again, they're more likely to convert. I'm going to put in that little extra effort because I know if I can get them into a conversation they're going to convert at a higher level. So absolutely, those higher priority leads are where we see a lot of sales reps leaning into making and sending a video. But what we do also find is that a lot of reps will also make what we'd call kind of a prerecorded or off the shelf videos, where they don't have to personalize it every time. And, for example, in an outreach sequence there may be a step three that says, okay, here's an email, here's a template and here is, you know, insert your video here, and it could be one that you've already recorded. So it could be instead of me saying Hey dan at a DUP, it's me as an individual and I'm just saying hey, it's tyler at videyard here really, you know, thanks so much for clicking play. The reason I'm reaching out is I work with a lot of demand gen managers, just like you Blah Blah about. So any time it's a demand gen manager, I just drop that video in and it's not going to work quite as well as a fully personalized one, but it's efficient and it may have a bigger impact than just the templated email message, but it's something that you can do and you can use it over and over again. So a couple different ways you can think about using video, both hyper personalized, custom recorded as well as when you have off the shelf that you can drop into an email anytime and send out. Yeah, interesting. Now shifting get a bit when spoken about a lot of the good that. I'm also interested to hear about the battle, but maybe I'm most a good right when it tends to practice when it comes to video prospects. Now I've been seeing a lot of us recently on Linkedin and other other places about age and SG as and just so beople in general, using tactics like the facetime cold facetime as a video prospecting which I find just bizarre right, where as a caught of a sequence that just randomly face timing and prospects, which you know, I'm sure, is shocking enough to potentially elicit a pick up at some point in time. But that's got to be considered poor practice. I would have thought in most circles right in terms of, if you would to maybe describe not quite such bad tactics in that but in end of the notts of good uses or video or the things to maybe avoid when it comes to video prospecting. Yeah, what if some of your filters are on that? Yeah, so there's there's a couple things when you're sending these videos. Yeah, that you absolutely need to be mindful of. One of the biggest mistakes sellers make is their videos are too long and you know they hit the record button and they want to get their entire message in there. They want to introduce themselves, they want to introduce their value proposition, they want to tell a customer story, they want to show the product up on the screen and ends up being two or three minutes long and for somebody who is not yet engaged in a conversation, they are not going to watch that long, no matter how great you are on camera. So our guidance is when you're using it for cold prospecting, aim for thirty to sixty seconds for these videos. It's enough time for you to get in there, introduce yourself, tease them a little bit with what you're trying to deliver, but then pop that out, because if somebody clicks on in the see that it's three minutes, they're not even going to watch. They're going to say enough time for this, so keep it short. There you go the kiss acron and I like...

...to say they're keep a short seller. Is a good first thing. The second is, as we talked about earlier, that sellers give up too early because they find that recording videos are you know, there's more that goes into it. Right like, as you said, it's if I'm not like feeling like I'm looking good that day, I may not want to make them. You know, I stumble over my words and it takes me ten minutes just to make one one minute video, which is very frustrating. But I think we have to reflect back on when we learn new techniques like this. It never pops right away. I mean, think about when you started cold calling, right like, how bad your initial cold calls were absolute and you know how long it's for you to get into that rhythm where it felt comfortable and you're like, okay, I got this, I've mastered in right so videos the same and again a lot of people will be inclined to try it. You know, they'll send ten to fifteen videos and then they'll give up on it because they haven't gotten their responses and or feels and efficient. And what I've heard from a lot of our customers is that sending around a hundred videos is kind of that threshold where people feel like, okay, I can just do this in my sleep. Now, I can hit the record button, I can nail my message and send it off. And a hundred videos may sound like a lot to people like whoa like that's going to take me a long time. But if you just do five videos a day, right, for a month, you're there. Yeah, or three videos a day for two months, right. And so just getting those reps in, because I promise you it's going to be a skill that you're going to leverage for the rest of your sales career. Right, this isn't just a one time thing. So you can get good at it now. A promise you. It's going to be a benefit to you, launcher. Yeah, and to your point, you know, getting comfortable and on camera as well, is just for those short snippets, is invaluable, particularly in the world we're now living him right, where it's shifting from so much in person so much virtual. And if you can get comfortable on camera and for thirty sixty seconds and that suddenly evolved into thirty minute meeting sixty minute meetings. It's a really important skill and actually just generally knowing how to carry yourself on camera is something that's that's overlooked as well. You know SDRs in the past. I remember when I started doing the job I was told, look, it doesn't matter if you if you if you mess up your call, the person can't see you. Just a repoints on the other end of the call or whatever. But actually, in turning today's selling environment, that's not the best advice because yes, in an str you know if you're making a call, but at some point in time you're going to have to get comfortable with seeing people and talking to people face to face and that that that short video pitched by cameras is a stepping stone to the longer conversations you'll have with prospects down the line. On that note, actually, so when it comes we've spoken a lot about the SDR community and yes, you know the sgr role using video as a prospect and tactic. I just want to go back to a point you made earlier where you were talking about a's having the ability to potentially increase second version rate to deal by by using camera. You you you spoken about one example, which was, you know, maybe talking through a proposal, for example, by by video. Can you maybe expand a little bit? On your way? You're seeing a huge video as a medium most often. Yeah, I think this is the the biggest opportunity, frankly, in sales right now and the most under utilized area for video. If you think about it from this perspective. You know, any time as a salesperson, you're going to try to communicate a message, you know, answer a question, explain something, walk through something with a prospect, you can right now. Your arsenal is usually well, I could type on an email and send it to them to answer that question, explain that idea. I could try to book a live video call and we could talk through it, you know, live, or I might send them an off the shelf piece of content for them to you know, again show them something or explain it. Those are typically the ways we would handle that today. You know, just sending an email, you know, it lacks that personality, that facetime. Those sorts of things trying to schedule a live video call is great, but often that's like the last thing your customer wants to do. Or you have a schedule for two weeks out and sending it off the shelf piece of content could be a nice way...

...to explain something, but it doesn't give you the ability to customize it for them or contextualize the message. Yeah, and so recording of video and sending it over is actually this really neat sweet spot right in the middle. Because if, again, if a customer asked, you know, how does this work? Right, instead of saying, oh well, let's book a meeting and I'll walk you through it, why don't I just record a video, bring up my screen, if I'm a software product or something like that, and I'll I'll walk you through it like I'll record a video, I'll explain it and I'll send it over. You can watch it on your own time, whenever you have a chance, and that video could be forwarded around to anybody else in the decisionmaking committee who needs to see it. And now all of a sudden you're videos getting watched by five or six people at that account. They've all suddenly now met you right without you ever getting on a call with them, you're becoming more memorable, you're becoming more human with them, and it's a really simple thing that you can do. So it's everything from you know. Again, they ask you a question, instead of typing out an email, hit the record button and say well, great question, you know. So I wanted to explain it personally, to give you some of the nuances. So the answer is Dat it, at it up. But you want to consider this as well. Right and again, getting them to click and watch your video. Now, not only do they get the information, but they're literally spending time with you. Right, you're again, you're becoming more familiar, you're becoming more personal, and that also signals to them it better experience with you than the other sales rap who's just sending them links off to stuff. So there's all these cases where you almost have to pause and think, well, I want to send them this information, answer this question, explain this idea. Would it makes sense for me to hit the record button and make a quick video to do it? And it's as simple as that and ends up opening up so many areas where you can make a video and use it in your process. Yeah, interesting, this might be a bit of a direct to one. But do you have any stats that you as a company getting a bit more specific about video? Yeah, that use as a company, have been able to capture or produce the suggest, you know, x amount of scentage, increasing time to win right, based on needing videos out of your so process rather than not. Yeah, it's it's interesting. We we don't have that primary data ourselves because, you know, we we know how many times videos are getting watched, but it's hard to then extract that further out. But that said, there was a research report done this year called the state of virtual selling, two thousand and twenty one, which surveyed, it was nearly a thousand different sales reps, you know, and how they were using video and from those who were using these types of video messages in their sales process, it was I think seventy three percent reported higher response rates with video. So that's kind of the prospecting side. But what the interesting thing was about fifty percent reported both shorter deal cycles and higher close rates. And shorter deal cycles. Again, it's interesting to think, well, how would just sending videos do that? But back to this point of instead of scheduling a meeting two weeks out to do a demo? What if I recorded a video and send it to them right now? Maybe that next meeting becomes a pricing discussion instead of a walkthrough. How can it increase close rates? Well, yeah, simple things like giving them a better experience during the process and standing up from your competitors, right through to sending over a proposal where you actually have a video of you walking through it, explaining it clearly to them so they know exactly what they're getting. So yeah, it's interesting to see people reporting those different areas by, you know, in pretty needs another process. It's definitely happening, absolutely and I think that's only going to continue evolving. To the earlier points that we are making around adoption still being relatively low despite video being such an important medium. Rule of US in today's selling environment. As a I think we when we think video, we think zoom, we think teams, we think Google. Have we don't think you know, short snippets where you can you can really add value in the sale process in between live virtual meetings. We've spoken all about selling and sales people. There's more than just sales departments. Of course, within businesses, marketing and customer success or other areas that I was I was thinking, as we've been able to done through this this this conversation, that are also areas that could potentially get involved in really utilize video as a medium of communication. What are your what are your thoughts on on other departments using...

...using videos as a means? Yeah, I think it's a very similar discussion. You know, customer success, Account Management, it's the same idea. You know, a big part of your role is to maintain strong relationships with your customers, to keep yourself top of mind so when the renewal time comes up they're not like, oh, wait a minute, who are you again? So when you are communicating out to your existing customers as an account manager again periodically, make sure you're sending them short video messages, because it gives them an opportunity to see you, for you to continue to be familiar and stay very personal with them. Are Really simple thing you can do. And, of course, yeah, marketing other areas of the business. You know, the use of video is growing. I think the biggest thing for marketing right now is using video as a way to educate audiences. It's less of about you know, it's a great advertising and Promo medium. But the best use for video right now, especially in D tob is to educate our customers, to show them clearly how something works, to clearly explain different ideas, because they want more and more to what to consume on their own time and more and more have a perspensity for visual information. So if we can answer their questions through video, whether it's stuff we preproduce or stuff we self record and send over as a video message, I think we're all going to be better communicators and will help our customers be more successful in the wan term. Yeah, and it's a really interesting point actually, that around marketing. So there's a couple of things. First thing is me and others have had more and more from prospects. You know, can you send us a two minute video or one minute video outlining a company right which is like at the High Level Company Promo? But then the other thing that I've been hearing a lot of some of our clients, so they're getting a lot of success with it, is that doing recorded testimony was for their clients. Absolutely the recorded testimony was where they're getting success is they're actually asking our climes to make it super informal. Can you just get like an iphone Selfie, or can you do it like it? To your point, like a video video, as rolling there being is really scripted professional video. There's been an ounce customers that doesn't really feel that authentic. Just do them, do to do a Selffie or do a bit, do a video, right, it sho super short, super informal. You know, just shoot from their hip and explain what you're actually really thinking about. You know your work with that particular vendor, and it makes it much more relatable, right, and I think that's so. That's on the marketing side, in our view. On the customer success side, we as a business, for example, it just really starting to invest now a lot in the customer success and and there's a lot of thoughts around how can we have we develop a customer success cadence. Now, you know, we've got a lot of people that are constantly involve with our customers. So is an email every quarter to the best option? Probably not. What's that? That looks like you're just checking in and it's not really any value. You know, is sending them a newsletter about your company? Good, it's okay, right. It's keeping them abreast of your company. It's okay. Is sending them industry content? You know? Good, yeah, it's okay, but if you could wrap that all up into a video and have a kind of regular caiden for keeping them up today and educated. To your point, just having that person front of mine, visual and feeling like they're talking to you makes it much more relevant and engage in than just receiving a newsletter that most of the time people culdick come subscribe right sope if yeah, it really does. Yeah, now I think you're I think you're spot on with all of that. And you know what I see a lot of people doing with with with things like that, is you have that the newsletter will have some updates, but it will often have a video as the hero and it might be, you know, an update from the CEO, it might be from the Vpcales, might be from the head of customer success or it might be from Sarah, the developer who built a really cool feature that we wanted to tell you about, you know, getting on a screen share and actually showing I'm really proud of this new feature that we built for you. I'm actually the one who built it. I want to show it to you and how it works right. Little things like that create this like these moments of these micro moments of connection with our audiences and ways that just we haven't really thought about traditionally. And so even those little things of like yeah, a video like that going one too many and then the account manager following up with their own quick little personal video to their to their customer, you know, saying, Hey, hope you saw last week's newsletter, really cool updates...

...from it. Just checking in, wanting to make sure everything was good. Let me know if you have any challenges this week, I can up solve for you. Right, just those moments again just create a better affinity for your brand. And we haven't done them traditionally because, well, it was difficult, it was expensive, like producing videos, uploading them, all of that. But that's all gone. Right, we can do this stuff, honestly, as quickly and easily as we can writing out text based content or making a slide. We just got to figure it out. Yeah, absolutely. Well, I have to say it's something that we double within our business. But you know, I'm sure us, and now those listening to this will starts to think about a lot more seriously moving forward because, to be honest, it's it's definitely should have opened up my mind to thinking about different ways in which all team, and not just test, you are right, all across a business can actually like video in it to make communication and engagement with clients and prospects more relevant and more engaging. So it's that that's really insightful. So I'm conscious of the time. We've been speaking for a little while now and and I think we're coming towards the end of all the amount of time that we meant to be discussing video prospecting for. So if anyonee to continue the conversation with you specifically, or indeed actually you video, for example, in get in touch about that. How would you suggest that people get in touch with you to continue the conversation? Yeah, thank you. Yeah, two things. One is, please follow me and connect with me on Linkedin. So Tyler lassard at videyard. You'll find me there. I share lots of tips examples of using video and sales as well as more probably than that, to check me out there. And then secondly, yeah, videyard is a free tool that anybody can use to record and send video messages as part of prospecting. You know, internally you want to send a colleague a quick video or do a screen share. So you sign up for free. Just go to videyardcom and sign up for free and start trying it out and see how it works and let me know on Linkedin what you think sounds good. Well, it's been a been a great conversation. It's been great to me. I really appreciate it. So I'm and I'm sure plenty of people would be getting in touch with you. I know, I know. I think I still need to connect with you myself on Linkedin is. I'm going to do that straight away. And Yeah, thanks again and look forward to catching up against wonderful my players were. Thanks for having me. Thank you. You've been listening. To be to be revenue acceleration. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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