B2B Revenue Acceleration
B2B Revenue Acceleration

Episode · 1 month ago

125: How to Stay Relevant by Leveraging Intent Data

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In the midst of rapid digital transformation, old school marketing and sales strategies are no longer effective. In fact, they’re probably driving your customers away.

In this exciting conversation with Latané Conant, CMO at 6sense, we’ll get her unique perspective on how best to approach your business development tactics.

After joining 6sense in 2018, our guest had something of an epiphany. Why cold call and force prospects to fill out endless forms when we can leverage the vast quantity of data we already have?

She decided to test her methodology, and it’s an experiment that’s paid off with a valuation of over $5 billion and consistent, sustainable growth.

Check out the full episode to learn how you can use intent data to reach new heights of revenue.

More information about Latané and her groundbreaking work:

To hear this interview and many more like it, subscribe to B2B Revenue Acceleration on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, our website, or anywhere you get podcasts.

You were listening to be tob revenue acceleration, a podcast dedicated to helping software executive stay on the cutting edge of sales and marketing in their industry. Let's get into the show. Hi, welcome to be to be a reven new acceleration. My name is an Amoutier and I'm here today with Lettny Convent, Cemo at six cents. Are You doing today? I'm amazing. Thanks for having me on the show, but a snaps with pleasure. So today we'll be speaking about as Zel teams and ill can be best liverage inten data. But before we get started, would you mind just introducing y'all, said very briefly, to all agience and tell us everything we should know about you? Oh Gosh, there's not. It's not that exciting, but my name is Yeah Letn Conan and I'm the chief market officer at six cents and we are a leading revenue platform that sales and marketing teams, as well as bed. Our team's work in to really take the guess work out of their prospecting and their marketing and they're selling. And I've been here quite a while in you know, startup land or startup world, almost four years. So that's like dog gears. I suppose. Some time. Yeah, long time, and before sixth cents, I was at a company called a Perio, which was more of a professional services company, and I was a GM I was a global marketing leader. So a lot of times when I talk I say I'm a recovering salesperson who's now good. So I've actually worked as a sells person. As Davidea, where you a what sort of sales position of you've been involved into. Yeah, I've been an account manager, I've been a frontline seller, I've been a sales manager and then you know GM, which is has the profit and loss as well. Yeah, but I just really love marketing and actually today what's interesting is in the way worse setup is the bedrs and SDRs do report to me. Obviously it's a it's a pretty shared relationship with sales and making sure we've got the right career pathing and getting them graduated into being sellers, but they do fall under under marketing and in our structure and and I see that about fifty percent of the time. Yeah, well, we we actually did a study that so logogo with a company called ten pounds and in fact, I think in the study, I don't want to don't qut me on that, but I think he was. Of Us, sixty percent reporting two cells, and I was a little bit shocked by that, particularly when you know that most of them I actually following UPLITZ created by marketing. I would have said that, you know, as you're following lips, it's created by marketing. You should be closed or to marketing that you would be to sells. But I do like what you are saying about Kara pathing, because that's super important. You know, the shell life of those videas. They all seems to be reducing every day by your mouths. And after Australians they want to promotion. So it's juice. Do Lots of promotion.

You have like a an active Cara Path. We do, and I mean I'm pretty so. I think it even starts in the interview process, right. So if you don't want to move into sales, like, if you're not if that's not your goal, then we basically you're you're not a candidate, a good candidate for us. So I think it's important just from the get go to set the expectation that you will move to sales and I sort of make the joke that, you know, this isn't your parents house. You know, you can't come home anytime you want. You can't live with me forever like you're you know, in thirteen to eighteen months you got to be out, and so I think it's just some of that that, you know, the expectation around saying like hey, I want to graduate you, and then, you know, working very closely with the teams that they will graduate, you know, logically graduate to. It is is really in an important part and I think that's the art. Typically, the argument to have them in sales is the career pathing. The argument to have them in marketing is when you think about the activities that they're doing and the need to like really give customers an Omni channel experience and have the right content and have the right message and have all the SLAS. That's the argument to have them, you know, in marketing. So you just have to be able to cover both, no matter where they live from an organization perspective. Yeah, I love what you're saying about the carry path and completely agree with you. In fact, we've got a very we've got a different analogy saying, well, look, opporatis is not a jail, it's not the parents. Also we got little bit more extreme. But we are very big on the carrier path and we also help. You know, sometimes because of the nature of the company, we are our carrier path and to be more towards operation. So people who are as Dr bed and then want to become a manager of a as Davidia team. But we've got to shoot that wants to become a and if they want to become a cond executive, we don't really have a ton of forwards in ourselves team. So they can want to join a Vendo and we are currently walking on setting up APLEANIMIN. In fact we've got a shot guinea pigs laying up. Well, we know that a good vendors people at developed talents, because not every single organization of your mindset, not every single organization wants to have people that they would accept to have a junior ae that made support for stream on six months. Lots of organization. They just want could a carrying people. You do it, you swim or you you sing, basically. So I think it's very refreshing to wear which you've got in place, guys, and super exciting. But just coming back to the conversation. But it also is makes sense right because it is on a ramp or the most expensive they can really, really hurt your cost structure. So for us, the more that we know that we can get people in as an MDA, are as an str, as a Bedr, they learn our...

...process, hmm, which and you know, and the process they learn as a Bedr MDR carries forward to the process that they also use as an AE. And then what we've done is, you know, we actually have a commercial segment that is sells a more simplified product and it's, you know, a lower price point. It's more of a volume and velocity model. So it's not like we're saying, you know, it's a natural graduation, which I think is critical to make it successful. And if I'm, you know, the head of sales for the commercial model Mac, his name is Michael Con Mac. The last thing I want to do is hire someone off the street who I don't know if they're going to be successful or not. I don't know if they, you know, understand our process. I don't know if there are cultural fit, I don't know if they're in an achiever. The hiring risk is one of the biggest risks to any sales organization. So if we can minimize that, it's like a total you know it. That's why the baseball teams have a farm leak, right, it's the same concept. Yeah, I'm with you. I think this too got smelt speaking about some moths. You wrote to book. I wish I had the time, and that's you to do it. I've got so much respect for people who actuality go and write two books of that book is called no falls, no spot, no cold cools. So can you please give audience an ovoview of the topics? You COVID IT book. Yeah, so the Genesis of the book was, you know, the last company I was at was all about customer experience and over and over again we proved that an optimize customer experience results in profitability and growth. And there's a million studies on this. I don't need to cite them all right, but and so I really believe that. And so then I you know, I came to six cents and got thrown in the wild world of Martech and sales tech and what I realized was a lot of the mare tech and sales tech wasn't actually designed to facilitate a better customer or prospect experience. It was about automating and, you know, counting leads and you know how many dials you do, and that really doesn't you know, those don't result in a good customer experience and they may or may not result in revenue either. So I looked at the data that our platform was sitting on top of and I looked at how much information is out there and how you can really use ai to take all of this information about your prospects and start to design a very different experience, and so I challenged my team to start. I said before the you know, I didn't set out to write a book. I set out to do an experiment and the experiment was guys, we have so much great information on our customers and on our future customer commers at our fingertips. Why are we spamming? Why are we...

...making making people fill out a form? I know who's on the website. I have that data. I know every piece of content they've consumed. Why is our bed ours randomly calling a list? That makes no sense when we know when an account is in market and we know what they care about. You know, and marketing can we can systemically get accounts in market so that our SDRs never have to make a cold call. And so I told the team, I said we're going to we are going to run our process with no spam, no forms and no code calls, and let's prove that it works. And so, you know, we've doubled every single year. You know, we just got, you know, a valuation of five point two billion dollars because of oural growth rate and because it's sustainable growth, right, we have a magic number of one, which is speaks to our cost structure for sales and marketing. And so we have like these amazing SASS economics, all based on our SASS metrics, because we run this no forms, no spam, no cold calls methodology that is all about data. Like, like my SDRs and bed ours are not guessing what account to all, who to call at the account what they care about, what's the right tactic to use? We're serving that all up every single day. Yes, so they can be successful. Otherwise it's just shooting in the dark, right, and we talked about that. We talked about most companies, most sales and marketing teams are operating and what we call dark funnel, so you know by the time somebody fills out of form and you know by the time an opportunity is being tracked in your crm, it's way too late. so much has already happened. And so for us we want to light up that dark funnel so that you know when an account is ready to buy, you know if that's a good account for you to sell to. You know why. You know what's going on with that account. Critical market updates. What technology is that account on? Great are they you know, do is there a partner that you can work with or, you know, is it a good technograph graphic fit for you? You know the keywords they care about. I mean one thing for my team is I'm like, I don't know why you're getting like you don't. You never need to guess what a subject line should fake because right in sixth sense, you know the top key word. Just put what you already know they care about in the subject line. It's so you know so so. It just we're really trying to put teams and people in a position to win and succeed and have great conversations. It's just, you know,...

...trying to be more human. It's about the quality of the interaction. I think the whole things. Every single time I hear it's a number game, I just want to pull my hair out because, and particularly with the automation, sometimes almost feel that it's like if I was about to prospect you. I don't even check you out, I don't even go on Linkedin, I don't try to understand you, I don't try to go into my crem system to see what you could have done. I mean, I'm not even talking about intent. Data are inten. Data is a goal made of information. Right with all the things that you are doing is super useful. Those guys have been consuming that content and that contended. That content is so good. You know you can read them a lot with it. But even if you forget that, you know we try to train our guys with their research and actually care about the person, because if you care with the person, if you've got to real reason why you should engage them, you are convinced yourself that you can help them, you won't be an entrance in the day. You will be potentially giving them an information that could tell them to get a promotional look good. Wow, that's going to put you in a position of winning it's like the energy we take his. Imagine your MMA fight or box or whatever. You would never stand on that train not knowing if the guy is a lefty or right if he's got a hook on epocket. You'll try to study the gay and train to win the fight. You will go there thinking that you will win that fight, because that puts you in the mindset is completely different from the number gay, where you're like, Oh, don't pick up, don't pick up. Oh God, he picked up. What am I supposed to say? All right, let's river out to the pitch, let's talk about my product and I'm going to put the not doubt there and see if someone buy it on it. And I think the poor quality of volume based approach, dialog base approach and stuff like that, particularly when you go to outswento prices, really killing the business, is really killing the art of actually having proper conversation, a proper inform conversation with the prospect and it's more difficult not to get off ghost through that sort of fuggy first sty sagons because people are like no, want to get rid of you. I know. Yeah, so it's about I love what you're saying about about being smartle. Let's talk about intense marketing, because obviously this is what you are doing at at six sens, we see a ton of value about it. At operatics we've got to a ton of plans who are using it and giving give us the data to support us in prioritizing and become the being more, as you mentioned, I curate, more relevant, more interesting when we've got the first touch. But if I was any BEDEAS DR manager, I don't use intend data. What would be the best practices or what are the best practices that you see how people at are using your int and data in the best possible way, including your own team, because I'm sure you you drink your own champaign right. Hmmm. So I think that it's really important to first of all a mass intent data, and there's different kinds. Okay, so there's keyword based and tent data, which is something that we we provide. Their's topic or category based intent data, which the leader in that is...

...a company called Bombora. Yeah, but we also bring that into our platform. There's what I call second party intent data, and second party intent data, the reason I call it that is they're not on your website or your property, but they're on a website about you. So think about like a GTWO or a trust radius. You want to have access to that. And then there's first party intent data, which is everything they're doing on your website. And then there's actually a new category of intent data that I'm calling pre intent data, and this is really important if you're trying to establish product market fit. If you really don't have a category. Yeah, and it's what are the things that someone would do to indicate they will be in market? So hiring trends, psychographics, so what it was getting posted on their you know, company blogs and things like that. Market insights, like things like did they just get funding? Technographic insights. So did they buy something that would indicate they would also buy your stuff? Right? And so there's this whole new category of what I would classify as pre intent data and you want to give your your team as much of that as possible. But just throwing it at them is actually not helpful. They'll probably just keep doing what their they won't use it. Too mentioned food, too much info. So it's critical. This is where the process and actually AI comes to bear. It's critical to be able to take that data and really synthesize it, like put it in a big ass brain, right, and what the AI is looking for is looking for patterns, right, and so that the AI is saying, you know what, typically, when we see this data, that this happened and that happen, an account is ready to be reached out to. So yes, you need all the data. That's great, and you want to give the AI as much data as possible to start to recognize patterns. But then you need to be able to distill it down into actionable workflows so that what happens is, as an stre every day I come in to the office, yeah, and I have a list of accounts that the AI has prioritized for me that are most likely to be ready in a prioritized order. But you don't want it to be a black box. So you don't want them to say okay, now, so just because I know they're ready, why are they ready? And so then what you also need to be able to provide where they work, so either in the crm solution that they're working in, or if they're an outreach or if they're in you know, and a sales engagement platform, doesn't matter. You want to be able to provide the account details so they can see why the AI predicted it to be in...

...market. They can see, oh, this is the website visits, these are the people that were showing the most activity. You know, this is, these are the webinars that they attendance. You want to give them like a console where they have this single view of all of the activity that they count is doing and then make it as easy as possible to action. So, for example, I come in, my day is prioritized. I know the accounts that are best. I Click, I go to the console, I have a persona map. Who are the key personas that are engaging with us? Who are the key personas that we need to engage, you know, to get this to an opportunity, and then it's clickable to say, okay, add that contact, okay, put that contact, reach out on linked it right so they can take all of the action that they need to right there. And things like recommended talking points are right there, like hey, we know their top keyword is account base marketing or predictive analytics or dat enrichment like it. We serve that right up. So they have this like very efficient way of working and and it makes their outreach relevant. So I think I talk a lot about like personalization, like who cares? Anybody can do a mail merge and like put my name in it or maybe look on Linkedin and be like, Oh, you went to Yah, like that's not helping me do my job. I don't care. It's all knowing that as well. It's relevants. What we want is every single outreach to be relevant and the factors and relevant to make it relevant are one, timing. Are we hitting this person up at the right time because we know there's interest, you know, or some reason to indicate that they're in market? Second is, what do we know about this persona and their job that we can give them a hint and some help on, you know, how to do their job better. Next is a countfit. So what do we know about this type of the type of account that they are? You know, if there are commercial account they probably show certain patterns. If they're a manufacturing account, they show certain patterns. So the type of account it is is also a factor and helping them be relevant and then act the actual activity that they're doing. So when you bring all those things together you can start to really connect with someone on how to do their job better, which is really what relevance is all about. Yeah, yeah, we're live and Spectinens, I think, is the winning's the winning bought of the game. Bastianization, just order linked in, start of the receiver, the invitation. People say, O, yeah, you did this, you did that to we have good connection coming. Okay, but why we allow at some points because, you know, connecting SMOS of people that way. Once you get to a certain number...

...of connections on Linkedin, you're connected everybody anyway. What do you want? So I'm very interesting about something is is to Connote, but you mentioned so that I did not know about. It is is very educational for me. We have a lot of a lot of our customer that, I would say are trying to create that category and we see intend data for us being super successful when, as you said, you know, there is a category that is created. People are looking for SD one, they are looking for endpoint security, they looking for same stuff that there is a category is it's people is are well of it. They go and search and they consume the content and we grab them and all that stuff it. We've got clients who are creating that can. They've got another up take on something that is being done and they are destructive and we really always struggled to you know, even when they've been using some companies like ever very toll, you know, demand based Tech. Target mentioned bomber. Are you there is the there's a fashion do with all those clients while using you guys, and actually we got some great success with when you're using we are using your solution. But can you zoom me a little bit more in that print and data, because I think it's a fair part of our audience. While I can that sort of start to be newish destructive, I want to create its. I want to get my content out there, but people don't find me because they don't know what to search for. Nobody's searching for me. So I'll do the print and data works. You mentioned that using crunge basis, you be looking at clues across the web and then you would have dia. You can of make it ren events. Yeah, yeah, so you can put in all these different filters or different alerts. You know, show me hiring trends, show me accounts that are doing a lot of hiring of a certain role. That might be an indicator. You know, show me accounts that have recent, you know, fundraising. Show me accounts that in their social like when they're posting, you know, on their own profiles, are talking about certain things that would indicate that they have a problem. Show me, not just like we think about something called an ecosystem by so, you know, you think about my company before a Perio, you know you needed to there are certain issbs that we knew that if you bought work day or you bought sales force, you know, service cloud, or you bought one of these clouds, you're probably going to need us. Right. So being able to look at, you know, what is the ecosystem of things that they're buying and how does that indicate that maybe they would need my services or my solution? You know, good example for me. You know, we integrate with a ton of like digital experience companies. So you know your drift, like drift will be powered by six sense data, for example, or optimized is or path factory or...

...what I was talking about, our console being embedded in a sales softer and outreach. So if you go and buy outreach, you probably need success. Yeah, you might not know about ABM or even care about Adm, right, but that's a huge indicator for us, right, and so so that's kind of this whole notion of the ecosystem. By that also goes into like how we think about pre intent and being able to serve that up for sellers and prospectors and media person yeah, or make sense through, you know, we just we have those capabilities because we acquired a company and have integrated that into our product called Clintel, was the product that we bought originally. Okay, so joys thinking, I love that and stuffin it is something that probably should take off line because we've got to fill fewer fell few clients in that space that are looking at solution to they'd love intend data, but they don't think it's for them, and that's probably because it all know, print and data. So something to talk about. One last question for you, and you maybe you little bit of a off a world one, because it's difficult to Ma generity is, but I'm curious to understand where the expectation of your clients when you sell them six sense. Okay, so let me tell you what come from. We have seen intend data being used as one of the tools to create in bomblets, okay, and we've work with clients and usually A. usually our clients would have their own inbound response management team. They users for the productive the users for the ABM, the users for the outreach, the users to go out, reach out to people. But what we realize that we often end up with the end and data because their internal team out sometimes complaining for the lack of a better world. That is not to lead. It's not someone wants to buy right now, and even sometimes it's not the Bedea as. Yeah, but he's the cells person. Well, I whoa. What do you mean? I need to go and create the demand. Those guys are not free to buy myself instree months. I actually have to say what don't only let I want the other alids. So I'm curious, Tom Dalston, if you feel that from your customer and from the market. Sometimes, you know, people have been used to have lots of thin bounds and kind of use you guys as a potential additional layoff in bound. But what you are doing is basically telling them look, people are looking around that stuff right there is an interest wilp you to prioritize what to talk to. It's an ABM approach, but you guys, we have to go and create the demon. Now you have to go into a bit of a Serg job on these people. These are not people are maybe ready to shop around straight with, some of them, maybe because they've been doing their research and but some may just be like in the planning face. So let's ready. So, first of all, do you feel that or do you have that sort of feedback from your clients as Dr Bid a teams, and how do you deal with it? Is You if you come across it? So a couple things. First of all, I would look at their inbound and...

...look at the conversions on their limb inbound and they probably aren't that great, honestly. So yes, someone filled out of form and they can set a meeting with them. That it probably anyway. I would be curious to dig in more holistically with these clients and their numbers. But that aside, what I believe in is I believe that the whole mql process has totally screwed up marketing and sales. And here's why. An mql is, by definition, a contact and we know as a sales leader, when I you know, when you do a forecast call and you start inspecting deals, one of the first things you test for is is are we multi threaded? Are you know? Are we talking to multiple contacts? Do we have multiple champions? Well, the longer a deal goes on, the actual harder it is to multi thread, because once you're in a deal, people tend to like want of them. Do all you off? Yeah, talking to other people, love us and so, but with an Mql we're saying, oh, we got one person for you by so we're literally queuing up single threaded deals for sales. This makes no sense. So our process is all about multi threading all the way through. So marketing job is to warm up multiple personas. Who may come in bound, who may not? I don't know right. We also run automations to enrich the record so that they're the contact data is there, because that's the other thing is like sometimes with intent data. You know that account, yeah, but at you got to go and call or email or reach out to some people. Yeah, the people, and so what you have to do, and what we do is we have an enrichment solution. So as the account starts to show more and more intent, I go and enrich that record so that when it's at the right intent level, all the contact data is there and ready to roll. The other thing I do. Whether it comes inbound or outbound or in market right, whether it's just an intent, you know, Opportunity, or whether they really do fill out of form and want a demo, the SLA is to reach out to three people. So you still have to work at im right. You don't just set a meeting up with one person, ever, you always have to set up at least for us. So for us, for into, you know our what we call six QA, which is a six cents qualified account. Yeah, the second it reaches six Qa status, we want twenty minutes response and three people get reached out to. So twenty and three inbound. Our SLA is six and three. Six minutes and three people squad. No matter what, you got to work the account, whether they requested and maybe that's...

...a layup, because you get that. But no matter what, and what that allows us to do is we have a very, very highly optimized conversion process. So, you know, we've got really great close rates, we've got highest piece we've got good cycle times, so it's a very, very efficient. It's actually a much more efficient process for sales. Yeah, and I don't tell sales. I want you to reach out to fifty accounts a day. I want you to reach out to four, but do it the right way. Right. So, and I don't know it's I think it's to some degree. I think it's a process all jump. I do think some of the automation is key. The workflow around it right. So you don't just get an account on a list like it has to be enriched, it has to be, yeah, ready to go, but I do think there's also a training aspect to it. The other thing is, like there's this mistake that like, so we back test our AI. Okay, and a back test tells you how many times was the prediction right, and so for you know from our model it's like it goes anywhere from eighty to eighty five percent. So it's not a hundred percent. This is not magic, but eighty five percent versus just guessing like this, like how much would you take to vegas if you had eighty five percent? Odds, probably a lot. where it and so explaining to them, but also having a Dq like again for the twenty and three like, there are sometimes that you know, anywhere from twenty to fifteen percent. It might not be. Maybe it wasn't the best fit account and that's okay. So they can dq it right and we're going to inspect that. But also having that is important and just again, it's about people need to understand the why and like what's really going on and like how them data works, how them are, because they're smart people and they're going to you know, again, I'm trying to put you in a position to win. You can guess are you can follow the process. Yeah, your call. This is what the process is built on and this is how we test and pressure test the process to make sure that it's working on this posing. You know, it's funny is that every single time people try to remove the element of prospection and using your brain in the process, the average you go. You go down, because marketings are creating leads to people what creating needs. Would you never really get the decision? Make out when you've got to leap coming. We see lots of people as asking fod the mode, because maybe they already selected the Vendo, but they need to have two or three. Yeah, gumming team, because there is a process. Why? I said look at the wind rates and look at your as piece, because exactly, and now too late, and be the earlien. You mentioned some fities. is so true. But to train in Europe we see it even more like the consents to spuying. Like I was sitting you but my destructive started. Wow, they've got solution. Everybody looks at it...

...shows us that's great. We need one with paying right and if you don't speak with everyone, you know you're going to get stuck. The S the sells process get stuck. So I think it's not just creating that first meeting of that first demo and getting them to be excited. It's so after in the sells process. Or do you go back and create more meetings, more engagement, meet with the right people, meet with a technical guy if you need to, and say look, technical gate, don't worry, you won't have to walk over night, you won't have to walk over the weekend, you won't have to cancel your on only they are the lake. It's going to be seamless to improvement. Go to speak to the game with the budget order, the actual business, the business case Guy Right, if you can influence that person from the top and then you got there is a cycle. But I personally believe that the biggest deal that get closed, and particularly you speak about three PM is people who actually do the step first. They don't wait for the fish to buy, the go and hunt, they go and create the dement and I think this is where your solution is fantastic, because you can really get to them before they met two ustrails or vendor. So technically, for me, that's the biggest competitive advantage. If you are there early, you can influence. If you are there late, you bet to look at the competition with your battle Cald and young. You know, you can us have a conversation about the business, what you can do for them and sell the business and sell your USP or you can just battle on products functionalities, and if I had the choice, I would definitely choose the former. But my point that I was trying to make that people feel uncomfortable having this conversation at the right clever. Sometimes, you know, it's difficult to have a conversation that isn't a product late conversation. Is Difficult to go at me, to see over person and say hey, tell me about your business, what are your places? Have a conversation about it and see how we could help you. And I think because we see a lot of people getting into the sells process and automating the selves process. And you know what, by next tape, let any would be to take us through, the more you're like, I don't want to demo, I need the business case now. But we need to do a demo because that's that's what sens for this. I should do as my next step. Right, right. I think there is a sort of force feeding of we have a process were, and maybe that's right for mid market and small businesses, but I think when it comes to trade, DM when he comes to Troun serprise through big deals, having tools like hers, it's like it's like clue in a murder investigation. Yeah, no, killed him. No, but I know that they went through that back door and he was a knight that did it and the guy is like a US nine Ni, right, you know, and that you narrow down. Right, you've got some other stuff and you narrow down, and that's but when we stop the curiosity of salves people, when we stop the prospection elements, I think that's really becomes difficult. You're dead. Yeah, yeah, no, I totally agree. And you want to encourage and reward for that and, you know, highlight the people that are doing it, but it kind of comes back. It comes from circle, or what I wrote the book about, which is the more lean into the customer experience.

Like, like it isn't your process, it's their process. It is, you know, it's again and dancing. You're not leading. Yeah, you are not there. You have to let them lead, which can be uncomfortable. But so it's like you got to know the steps, though, right. So that's where I think some you know you have to know the steps and how to adequately respond, but know that you need to be queuing off of their behavior and their signal to be successful. Hey, it's about bringing the right people at the table as well, you know, and again I think I think you can. You mentioned some yet really resonate with me, which is the falls all down. You know, the the Cy called the tough fight is you won't be able to go back to the old people because they all got my team getting with it. I don't want to talk to you. I've got a project. It right and I've got you in my little box. Don't embarrass me exactly. So look unsotunately, but we could probably carry on fun as our yeah, but it gets into the ends of the GPS of for today. He was a great conversation. Thank you so much, but I took a first notes and few toupiece that I want to take a flight with you. Very insight for so thanks for that. If people wants to reach out to you, I'll connect with you and not. You also very active in CMO communities in the US. You've got to fill a few things going on. What's the best way to get to one of you? Yeah, linkedin always works and as good I do. If you're a CMO, I'd love to have you in my community. It's about Zozo bbcmos now and wow, we talk about everything and anything. It's very informed. Normal. We meet weekly and cover a topic that the CMOS think is most relevant and it's interesting. While the community has grown so significantly, it's almost like a family, so we always welcome new ideas and opinions, so feel free to reach out to me on that too. That's Fondolf who. Well, thank you so much for today. I been very grateful of your time and so much insight. So, yeah, thank you so much for all time to day at to me by by I you've been listening to be tob revenue acceleration to ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (130)